Dayton Public Schools fail marketing 101

This is far from the first post on the extended failure of Dayton Public Schools to manage their marketing resource acquisition.

If this is your first time finding out about this, this post is the full recap, with all the documentation to let you examine the process and see how to fail at issuing an RFP for professional services. First clue- don’t have a single marketing professional on staff to help you evaluate what you are buying.

Second clue: have someone who has no knowledge of how to pick an ad agency write the RFP/RFQ.

thumbnail of RFP-16-846-Comprehensive-marketing-services1.docx2-3

The initial RFP for “Comprehensive marketing services” issued by the Dayton Public Schools

With that said, here is the absolute failure that they issued to start the process. It was missing so many key pieces of information, like a budget, an objective, that it made me wonder if there was anything already written to serve as a guideline for picking an ad agency for governmental organizations. There wasn’t, so I wrote this for The Next Wave blog: Hiring An Agency: The R.F.P. Guide (for Governmental Organizations)

Well, actually I wrote it after the School Board missed their original start deadline of Sept. 21, and threw out the recommendation of their purchasing department who ran this “process” on November 1st.  It was pointed out that their “RFP process” kept favoring big firms, who they’d already worked with, and that the scoring rubric seemed to be off- especially since my firm had real diversity qualifications (Certified Service Disabled Veteran Owned Business by the VA, HUBzone by the SBA, Ohio ED/GE). They also wondered how a team that included a photographer, Larry Price, who has won an Emmy and the Pulitzer prize for photojournalism twice, didn’t rank higher as “qualified.” Five firms applied. Due to a cc instead of bcc on an email, I knew who the competition was. Had the process been handled competently, my bid should have been very well received.

Superintendent Corr’s answer was to suggest they go out and ask other districts how it’s done. Next came a new instrument to ask for proposals- this one, a Request for Qualifications. The difference being that the purchasing department is supposed to be ranking how qualified each agency is to do the job – to suggest who the board should consider issuing a contract with. Since there isn’t really supposed to be any proposed work, the instrument should be administered in a way that’s kind of like the Pepsi Challenge- blind of branding, just asking to see examples of past work, and describing the skill set of each organization. Yes, you can ask for prices- for a set service, but, usually, you would leave out anything that would tip off an evaluator who submitted what.

thumbnail of RFQ-16-846Q-Comprehensive-Marketing-Services

DPS issues RFQ to replace RFP for marketing services

This wasn’t how they did it. In fact, much of the RFQ was a copy and paste job from the RFP. They were still asking for timelines, plans, and now, added how would you spend $75K. This time only 3 of the firms bid, with one subcontracting one of the other first round bidders to fill their “diversity” quotient.

The RFQ asked for a lot of “reporting” proof. Can you show that your marketing dollars spent were effective type things? Showing Neilsen numbers (as Ohlmann does for a lot of their response) doesn’t tell anyone how many widgets were sold. And, unless it’s the EFFY awards (Effectiveness), no ad awards shows actually care if your ad actually sold more widgets, but awards were important. Laughably, The Ohlmann Group bragged at length of how they’d won lots of “Mercury Awards” from the local ad club- the only problem is, they aren’t real awards given by judges- it’s a popularity contest- much like what the Dayton Business Journal does with “Best Pizza in Dayton” awards.

The RFQ, much like the RFP was based on a Board provided guesstimate of total hours of 3120- or 1.5 man years. This district is in much greater need of 1.5 man years- especially if they are hoping to do a rebrand. Both Ohlmann and The Next Wave would want to fix the website that was built in a proprietary content management system (supplied by the third bidder Upward) that has already cost the district a small fortune. Hilariously, it can only be maintained by one person in the district, the current default Public Information Officer Jill Drury, who came out of TV news and has no marketing chops.

thumbnail of RFP-16-846Q-CMS-QA-18-January-2017

DPS Q&A for the RFQ

There was a Q&A issued 2 days before the turn in deadline of 20 January, 2017. In it, it clearly put a cap of $300K on the project. My firm, The Next Wave bid under it, at a fixed price to deliver 3.5 man years or 7280 hours. And, as a caveat, as long as we were on retainer and doing the work we specified- all the other stuff that they never budget or foresee, we’d do it at the effective rate of $41 an hour. The other two bidders were considerably more expensive- with the average hourly rate of $113 for the “winner” picked by purchasing and hired by the board without a contract review before the vote.

Now, what I’m asking you the reader to do, is to pretend you care about your school district, and where public dollars are spent. And take the time to actually read the proposals submitted by each of the three agencies.

Then read the score sheets/evaluators forms. Then read the contract issued to the Ohlmann Group, waiving the 48 hour rule to vote on it a week early at a meeting without public comment. Then, you decide- who had the best plan, the most cost effective proposal?

Remember that there is still a digital divide in Dayton and that the households feeding DPS schools are mostly poor and many don’t have reliable high speed internet. Also know that almost all broadcast media would have serious over-reach, delivering the DPS message to people who wouldn’t send their kids to DPS if you paid them (the exception being St. Ivers- I mean, Stivers).

That’s why The Next Wave proposal for a media spend of $75K a year was to hire someone in each neighborhood to meet the kids at the central bus stop and take attendance as the kids got on the bus. Then to follow up in the neighborhood with housecalls on homes where the kid may didn’t made it to the bus- and to try to figure out what the district can do to get the kid in school- all before the bus even makes it to the building. Novel idea? Creative? More valuable to the district than a TV campaign? You tell me. Some friends of mine who run a very hot shop in Minneapolis have a mantra- “Actions speak louder than words.” Doing things always beats talking about them in our book too.

Here are the documents provided by the DPS legal counsel for each agency. Note, she gave me scans of printouts, not the original high resolution PDF’s that each agency submitted, with the hope that the low-fi, non-ADA compliant docs wouldn’t be able to be posted and indexed as well- but, don’t worry- I ran them through OCR. Only The Next Wave doc has working links.
Note, the Ohlmann and Upward submissions both run 100 pages. The longest proposal we’ve ever done for a non-governmental client has run 6 pages. Why government purchasing departments think requiring so much information actually helps the process is beyond me.

thumbnail of TNW RFQ proposal

The Next Wave RFQ response

thumbnail of PRR – D. Esrati – Ohlmann Group RFQ Response

The Ohlmann Group RFQ response

thumbnail of PRR – D. Esrati – Upward Bound RFQ Response

The Upward Brand Interactions RFQ Response

Next is the evaluators score sheets. We were told there were 5 evaluators and that one was the superintendent. One can assume the woman from purchasing who ran this mess, Teri Allen, was also one. Obviously, after me calling for her firing after the first round debacle, she’s going to score for anyone but The Next Wave.

The comments in scoring are very different for the three firms.

Of course, my mockery of the actual RFQ in our response- which had the audacity to ask for an Org chart when DPS barely has one, isn’t helping engender warm fuzzys, but, this district has serious problems and asking about org charts makes me wonder?

How does an Org chart make you do better ads? Websites? Video production?

The real key is to read the RFP and then realize the RFQ is yet another cut and paste job- looking to create “gotchas” instead of to actually evaluate what an agency is bringing to the table.

I always tell new clients that hiring an agency is a lot like dating- it takes almost a year before you really know enough about each other to do anything really great. Of course, if you baseline is decades of mediocrity, it’s not too hard to look amazing out of the box.

thumbnail of PRR – D. Esrati – Project Overview and Scores – Marketing RFQ

The RFQ scoring instrument

The last document is the actual contract, which was presented to the board on board docs as a $112,500 contract instead of $345K. Then there were the two additional “option years” making the whole thing a million dollar commitment.

The school board actually bought this contract, without reading it. Mostly because they were told they had a 90 day out (which was specified to all bidders in the RFQ).

The contract has one hinkey legal mistake, that should make it null and void:

2. In the event of a conflict, precedence shall be given to the following order: (1) this document, (2) the Request for Proposal, and (3) the Contractor’s proposal response, (4) “SOW’ for specified project scope.

Uh, what RFP? This was a response to an RFQ. The RFP had been withdrawn. Of course, you can’t see the top secret RFP, unless it’s actually awarded. Of course, The Next Wave proposal didn’t shy away from sharing our ideas fully- because, well, we actually care enough about this district to have done all this journalism to expose the incompetence at the top.

thumbnail of PRR – D. Esrati – Ohlmann Group Contract

The DPS contract with the Ohlmann Group

The real question is, how many people will take the time to examine all this? Probably not many.

That’s why we produced a video to walk you through the whole thing- ending with the absolutely insane meeting between Board Members Adil Baguirov, Sheila Taylor and John McManus with the representatives from the Ohlmann Group.

We’ve already posted and talked about this meeting, and a few of you watched the whole 90 minute debacle. The meeting was mostly Dr. Adil Baguirov showcasing his marketing expertise, including advocating for the use of Flash- a web application that’s almost universally despised by any modern web developer and has never been usable on any Apple iOS device.

You are probably wondering what the next step is? It’s pretty obvious that after calling for the resignation of 5 board members, and Superintendent Corr, it’s highly unlikely that they’ll change their mind and hire us. Of course, come Jan 1, 2018, there will be four new board members who may want to be able to fully explain why the current board and their picks for Superintendent and Treasurer have caused this district more trauma than triage.

There is another post coming that should clearly change the course of coming board action, but, it will take a considerable amount of time to write and fully document. It’s the final chapter for one of the DPS pretenders.

In the mean time, to those of you who take the time to read all the docs, I’d love to hear your evaluation of this three ring circus.

Criminal incompetence at a Dayton Public Schools Board of Education meeting

For the last 6 months the new Superintendent, Rhonda Corr, has been trying to excommunicate David Lawrence from Dayton Public Schools. The former Chief of School Innovation, was demoted several times to try to get him to quit. She couldn’t use the Reduction In Force (RIF) ruse that she used to clean out some of downtown last fall, because she assigned his duties to no less than 3 other people.
She brought in Dr. Elisabeth Lolli and Dr. Markay Winston at similar or higher pay, and also assigned some of his work to Dr.  Bucheim. You can review some of this mess in the really long post: The calamity named Rhonda Corr.  Corr could have assigned David Lawrence to be the principal at the troubled Meadowdale too, but instead, hired in a guy from Texas. Lawrence was signed to a contract through June of 2018, and it was either work with him or buy him out. That’s how contracts work.
Lawrence started to use some of his accumulated 20 years worth of sick leave while his attorney and the board negotiated an agreement for his separation. Here is a copy of the very easy to read separation contract: DPS-LAWRENCE Agreement 2-17
Three short legalese paragraphs set the stage, and then the first clause:

1. Upon his execution of this Agreement, Employee shall cause to be delivered to the Superintendent his irrevocable letter of resignation from all employment positions held with the Dayton City School District. Said resignation shall take effect on February 21, 2017.
Employee’s letter of resignation shall be accepted by the Board, without public comment, at its next regular meeting following Employee’s execution of this Agreement.

But, when this item comes to the board, you don’t have to watch very long for Dr. Adil Baguirov to start commenting- thereby violating the contract, and voiding it.  First with his discussion of waiving the 48 hour rule to vote (as specified- “its next regular meeting”) thinking this isn’t an emergency. The reason they had to waive the 48 hour rule is because they can’t seem to prepare for meetings and actually post their agenda more than 48 hours in advance for issue C & G.

Baguirov is right, there has been plenty of time to discuss and post and not need the waiver. I pipe in “This is incompetence”- out of order.

Then Dr. Walker asks to move to executive session, and then Baguirov says we shouldn’t get rid of Lawrence on fiscal competency grounds, and then says to give a very qualified administrator over $200,000 to see him go as essentially unearned income.

Then he speaks on behalf of Board Member Taylor- who would agree with him, but she’s not here. Lacey says talking about what other members think is wrong.

Then Rountree jumps in that this has been discussed plenty in executive session, and no one knows why Taylor isn’t there. And calls for the up or down vote.

Ron Lee then has to agree with Rountree that this should be voted on. And that earlier decisions weren’t right (like hiring Corr over Lawrence?).

Then they are to vote to waive the 48 hour rule, Baguirov and Lacey vote no, the rest vote yes, 4 yes, 2 no.

Then there is confusion because Walker can’t tell what to do next. Where I pipe in “The buyout because of the personality conflict” again out of order. You hear a sigh from someone.

Then Corr asks to do D, E, F- skipping the actual vote on the issue that they just waived the 48 hour rule on. #FAIL. Of course, no one in the audience can follow the agenda, because the “Board Docs” application isn’t mobile friendly, it’s barely laptop friendly.

Then Lacey agrees for D, E, F and Hazel asks you have to vote on the first one, and Lacey says you don’t and we have an argument about order- because, well, confusion is always the best way.

Then McManus talks about transportation directors- he hasn’t said anything other than yes to waive the 48 hour rule on C&G.

Then Baguirov and Lacey want to withdraw their motions and confuse it more.

Now Lacey wants to separate the motion and gets in a fight with Rountree calling it a game, and he gets belligerent and wants to deal with something different. And then back to Mr. Lawrence and E & F.

Again mentioning Lawrence. Walker mentions Lawrence. We’re now 13 min and 31 seconds in- and voting on everything but Lawrence. Rountree abstains. 5-1.

Then Corr tries to come back to number D 1, and then G, a settlement agreement. Rountree moves, McManus seconds. Walker asks for further discussion- and Baguirov says he is staunchly opposed to this, due to the RIF on fiscal grounds. He can’t allow to pay over $200,000 to someone who isn’t going to be working here. There is work that Mr. Lawrence is qualified to do. He doesn’t understand why the board would allow this. He calls it a “massive payment.” And says he’s been against it in executive.

Rountree then says “treat people in the way you want to be treated” including buyouts and goes on about contracts. Lee continues about the issue and puts it back on Baguirov for this beginning under his watch.

It doesn’t matter what any of them think, the contract had to be voted on, simple yes/no and move on, without discussion. This discussion all violates the contract. Corr didn’t step in and stop discussion. Neither did board lawyer Jyllian Bradshaw.

In a corporate setting, these intentional missteps would be cause for termination. F&I insurance may cover the cost of the failings, but the board members would still be asked to step down. Unfortunately, school board members in Ohio can’t be removed by ballot initiative. Can they be removed for exposing the district to additional lawsuits?

At this point, the correct thing to do is to accept the resignation of all who discussed the issue violating the contract, Walker, Baguirov, Lacey, Rountree and Lee. Only McManus has abided by the terms. Taylor wasn’t present to get herself in trouble.

Corr and Bradshaw were responsible for managing this process. Both failed.

Let’s begin with 5 new school board members, a new attorney, and then let the new board decide if they should keep Corr, or terminate her for cause because of her inability to not only manage David Lawrence, but failure to control the process at the meeting bringing the district additional legal battles.

The obvious choice to replace Corr as superintendent? David Lawrence.

 

 

 

 

 

DPS superintendent search takes wrong turn

Last week, out of the pool of what Dr. Baguirov keeps calling a “highly qualified candidate pool” – the board had it narrowed to 3 candidates from six.

They were current Dayton Public Schools Chief of School Innovation, David Lawrence, relatively new hire- Gregory Roberson, Ed.D. Chief of Office for Exceptional Children and a curriculum chief from Beavercreek, who was picked to be superintendent elsewhere after applying for every job she could.

I chastised DPS BoE president Baguirov for fiddling while Rome burns. After the only outsider left, left, there was a quick scramble to enlarge the pool- and more candidates were considered, including some retreads like Debra Brathwaite who was the number two that was previously passed over when Dr. Mack left.

In fact, if you read the post about Brathwaite, you could be saying history is about to repeat.

Greg Roberson, candidate for Superintendent of Dayton Public Schools

Greg Roberson

For the three finalists tonight at the public forum- we have internal candidate Greg Roberson with less than a year in the district, and a very short career in education, starting in 2003 after a long career as an enlisted man in the Air Force.

Roberson is the newly hired head of the department of exceptional children. A job he got after the Trotwood public schools did a talent raid last year- hiring away 9 of our more talented people- including Tracy Mallory, who was at Horace Mann as principal before being promoted into this position. That’s also when we lost David White, who had turned Belmont around and was currently assigned to Ponitz. He was the highest paid principal in the district- making $15K a year more that Erin Dooley at Stivers- who hasn’t received a raise in years- despite having guided the districts only success story for years.

If you wonder why we’re constantly short of teachers, maybe the board can look back at their previous decisions, and come to a conclusion?

Rhonda Corr- finalist for Dayton Public Schools

Rhonda Corr

Rhonda Corr– coming out of Indianapolis, who hired her after there was a meltdown in Chicago, where Ms. Corr worked with former Chicago schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett. An article on Cleveland.com talks about how Parma (a large suburb of Cleveland) rescinded their offer to Corr- referred to as “Corr-Saegert” – but couldn’t find out if the issues in Chicago had bearing- they define her leaving Chicago:

Corr-Saegert was laid off her job as the chief of 36 Chicago public schools in June, the day after Byrd-Bennett resigned. Byrd-Bennett, who headed Cleveland schools from 1998 to 2006, had been on leave since April amid a federal investigation into a controversial, no-bid $20.5 million contract with a principal training academy, where she once consulted.

Corr has been busy applying for superintendents jobs elsewhere- Salt Lake City, and the Washington Local superintendent position, where a great pool included 19 candidates according to the Toledo Blade. Maybe there is a reason she keeps getting passed over?

Dan Schroer candidate Dayton Public Schools

Dan Schroer

Last person added to the final three is Dan Schroer, who has also been busy applying for Superintendents positions, including Beavercreek. His background is mostly agrigultural and voc-ed, but has been the Superintendent of the Margaretta Local Schools, Erie County, Ohio up around Sandusky. He seems to have job hopped his way around the state for years.

The Board Of Education, seems to think that there is no reason to hire a Dayton Public Schools graduate, who is in one of their top leadership positions- whose job function is “Innovation”- who has dedicated his life to working in the Dayton Public Schools- and has letters of support from 28 principals. Leaving David Lawrence out of this public “audition” is clearly a strategy to show the city who the new sheriff is in town.

The votes last night were all close- but, the two women on the board seem threatened by a strong, no-nonsense leader that knows the district inside out- and Dr. Baguirov, who thinks he should be in charge, is flexing his muscles. Note- Baguirov and Rountree are both serving their first term of unchallenged election. Sheila Taylor, apparently thinks that no internal candidate would be a good choice- because, well- despite her slightly longer tenure on the board, she still is mostly a labor puppet, and Lawrences strong belief in using pay for performance doesn’t sit well with her.

How any superintendent from out of town is going to figure out how to turn around a district in 2 years, is a mystery to me. This is a large organization, one of the biggest in the county, with many moving parts, different regulations, funky constituencies and big challenges.

Unfortunately, we can’t recall the Board of Education. What we can do is show up in force and demand that the board reconsider their picks, after we hear from these three Dayton rookies- and ask that the board reconsider Lawrence as an option.

Just remember- “A” people hire “A” people, “B” people hire “C” people.

 

Whaley’s candidates withdraw from Dayton School Board race

Late yesterday, Jerry Brunswick and John Lumpkin both withdrew from the Dayton School board race.

This is the day before the the Montgomery County Dems are to meet to endorse.

This brings the race to the 3 incumbents, Rev. Robert Walker, Nancy Nearny and Sheila Taylor, vs. one challenger, John McManus.

Word on the street was that Brunswick and Lumpkin were Mayor Nan Whaley’s hand-picked candidates and that Matt Joseph helped them get their signatures.

Once again, “democracy” is thwarted by the Monarchy of Montgomery County.

This just went from an interesting race to not much of one.

Montgomery County Democratic Party picks school board candidates

Despite just being picked to be on the school board from a large field of qualified candidates by a majority Democratic party board- the Rev. William Schooler finds himself the odd man out in the coming school board race when the Democrats endorsed the other three candidates in the four-way race for three seats.

The election wouldn’t have even been necessary, since Nancy Nearny’s original petitions came in 8 signatures short of the 350 required until her angels at the Board of (S)elections found her 8 that got her back on the ballot.

According to sources, The Montgomery County Democratic Party tonight endorsed incumbents Nearny and Sheila Taylor (a party patronage employee in the county) and the Rev. Robert Walker (who is running with Schooler as a “team”) in the race. It’s unclear if Walker even asked for the endorsement.

Of course, Schooler is the only incumbent running who said no to GE and UD on corporate welfare, which paints a big bull’s-eye on his back. Sitting member Joe Lacey even tried unsuccessfully to have Schooler censored for suggesting that the schools would have to come to the voters for yet another levy after helping GE pay the schools nothing for 15 years. (update: Lacey lost)

Considering that the school board race is supposed to be a non-partisan one, it’s interesting that the party feels a need to take a stand.

Seeing that Nearny and Taylor helped pick Schooler in the first place makes this whole thing all the more odd.

What’s even sadder is that more of the people who applied for appointment didn’t even bother with  attempting to run.

 

Dayton Board of Ed votes 4-3 to donate taxes to GE/UD

To the school board members, my firm, The Next Wave, is not under contract to do PR for you, we’re working on process improvement and improving enrollment. But, had we been giving PR advice- and trying to help you prepare for any future levy, we would have recommended a few things:

  1. Legislation that arrives on your desk at the beginning of the meeting- that you haven’t had time to properly review is disrespectful to you, and to the community. It should always be tabled for public examination and review. You represent the community- and without opportunity for community input, you are neglecting your duties. I couldn’t find a required inspection period in Ohio Revised Code for legislation- but, I always believed there was a 48-hour period required- unless voted on as an emergency.
  2. A review of all previous TIF agreements that the Dayton Public Schools has been asked to sign off on over the last 20 years- with proof that these deals actually do provide “economic development.”

This shouldn’t be too difficult, since Ohio Revised Code requires a “Tax Incentive Review Council” which should include a designated appointee from your organization:

A The legislative authority of a county, township, or municipal corporation that grants an exemption from taxation under Chapter 725. or 1728. or under section 3735.67, 5709.28, 5709.40, 5709.41, 5709.62, 5709.63, 5709.632, 5709.73, or 5709.78 of the Revised Code shall create a tax incentive review council. The council shall consist of the following members:1 In the case of a municipal corporation eligible to designate a zone under section 5709.62 of the Revised Code, the chief executive officer or that officer’s designee; a member of the legislative authority of the municipal corporation, appointed by the president of the legislative authority or, if the chief executive officer of the municipal corporation is the president, appointed by the president pro tempore of the legislative authority; the county auditor or the county auditor’s designee; the chief financial officer of the municipal corporation or that officer’s designee; an individual appointed by the board of education of each city, local, exempted village, and joint vocational school district to which the instrument granting the exemption applies; and two members of the public appointed by the chief executive officer of the municipal corporation with the concurrence of the legislative authority. At least four members of the council shall be residents of the municipal corporation, and at least one of the two public members appointed by the chief executive officer shall be a minority. As used in division A1 of this section, a “minority” is an individual who is African-American, Hispanic, or Native American.

via Lawriter – ORC – 5709.85 Tax incentive review council..

The vote, 4-3 in favor of corporate handouts to GE had the backing of county employee Joe Lacey- who was elected because he opposed the buying of the Reynolds HQ to become the DPS administration building. However, he seems to see no problem with giving up of millions of potential dollars to fund Dayton Public Schools and instead be directed to his alma mater, the University of Dayton, through this deal.

Voting Yes for the abatement with Mr. Lacey were board president Nancy Nearny, Sheila Taylor and Ron Lee. Voting No were Yvonne Isaacs, Stacy Thompson and newcomer Reverend William Schooler, who vowed to explore legal remedies to stop this deal. Schooler is the only one of the No votes facing re-election in November; Nearny and Taylor are also up for re-election.

The abatement to GE should make every single business in Dayton reconsider their property tax liabilities. While many small businesses have paid willingly to fund a school system that they perceive as failing, it seems that any new employer entering the community gets the option to redirect their share to benefit them. Imagine if I, decided to pay my property taxes to a neighborhood non-profit, Historic South Park, instead of paying them to support schools. Or better yet, I make my “payments in lieu of taxes” to my landlord, to thank him (me) for the restoration of a vacant building so I can get subsidized rent? (full disclosure, my building did get a tax abatement on improvements for a period of 12 or 15 years, but we still had to pay the value and increases on the original building during that period. The building was bought for $2,600 plus $2,400 in back taxes).

I wasn’t able to attend the full meeting, but was there for the final vote. When it came time for the roll-call vote, Mr. Lacey felt it necessary to become the mad parliamentarian, interrupting those who wanted to explain their vote when they made it- screaming for Madame President to cut them off- that discussion period was over- and that only a yes or no response was called for.  I’ll try to find the link to the complete 3 hour+ debacle and post it.

UPDATE July 7. 6:30 PM: The video is online, http://dpstv.pegcentral.com/player.php?video=9349ce9f41ed262552c71cf8aef00119 the voting begins at 2:5o or so, at 2:51:15 is when Mr. Lacey starts his screaming- while Yvonne Isaacs makes her justification, when Schooler does the same thing later- he speaks at a more normal tone. I was in the room- and I felt that he was screaming. [end update]

Also, I made a public records request for the full legislation as presented and passed. I will also post that for you to review. The Dayton City Commission is probably voting on this same TIF agreement tonight at their 6 p.m. meeting.

I’m interested to see what GE actually promised in writing in exchange for this deal. Guarantees of employment? Income tax generation? Actual hours of volunteer time in the schools.

If there had been time for citizen review, I could answer those questions, and you could ask more- before the vote.

a later thought The best economic development tool cities have: good schools. I wonder how many TIF agreements in Centerville, Kettering or Oakwood have been passed with total abatement- including the schools.