Dayton Daily news lays off Post and Kollars

In the ongoing effort to remove all institutional knowledge and reason for buying the paper, the geniuses at Cox Ohio decided that two senior staff were no longer needed.

As the pool of institutional knowledge shrinks- their ability to connect the dots on stories shrinks even more.

Confirmed by Jana Collier, Vice President of Content at Cox Media Group Ohio,  last Friday walking papers as of Dec 31 were handed to two senior staff: Connie Post- “Team leader- Entertainment” or the Life Section Editor/editorial page contributor or “Newsroom Production Editor at Dayton Daily News” depending on where you find it. Connie was known as the queen of recipe trials- aside from her other duties. She’s one of the few edumacated folks down in the puzzle palace- with a PhD in English from Texas Tech. The drawl is still evident. Her latest love has been photography- building a huge following on Facebook, where she also occasionally posts videos of her playing the piano. A real renaissance woman. Last time Cox tried to sever ties, she threatened them with a discrimination lawsuit according to sources– and with her no comment on her dismissal, another suit may be in the works.

UPDATE

9 Dec 2016- Post sent a certified letter stating she never threatened Cox with a lawsuit, and I have no foundation of a threat now. That information came from what I consider a very credible source. She “demands that I remove the post.” As a professional journalist- she should know better how these things work. There is no “removing” anything from the Internets- just corrections/redactions. Note- I did call her for comment, before I contacted Jana Collier. 

Post came to the Dayton Daily news back in July of 2000- giving her 16 year 6 months of experience.

Also ejected from the game was Brian Kollars. I’m sure he’d be bestowing “Knuckle head of the week” award on someone in the cox empire, if he was still the sports editor. From his official bio:

Brian Kollars has worked for the Dayton Daily News since 2003. He was named Investigative Team Editor in March 2012 and works with a staff of five to uncover government waste and dig into key topics in our community. He also collaborates with WHIO-TV on I-Team stories and writes a Sunday Sports column entitled “Second Thoughts.” Prior to his current assignment, Brian worked as Sports Editor for seven years. He edited many sections that won state and national awards and his writing resumé includes a Best of Gannett. Brian was born and raised in Yankton, S.D., and is a graduate of Valparaiso University. He enjoys coaching youth sports and lives in Oakwood with his wife and three children.

Source: Brian Kollars | www.mydaytondailynews.com

So besides getting rid of Brian, the Cox sisters also just ruined Christmas for his three kids.

Nice.

Looking at the staff listing on the DDn site is almost a laugh.

Bennish has been gone for months.Jessica Heffner, Dave Larsen, Tiffany Latta, Ken McCall, Allison Wichie and of course- former HMFIC Julia Wallace- all gone…but not forgotten on the DDn staff page.

And it’s been kept a secret- but both Meredith Moss and Tom Archdeacon aren’t really with the paper anymore- they’re just contract staffers now.

For some of us, Arch is the only reason we bother to pay for the damn thing.

For a company that’s “digital first” – they really need to learn how to keep basic information relevant.

Did your Dayton Daily news seem a little less significant this morning?

The Dayton Daily news and Cox Media eliminated 7 people yesterday.

Some, were out on assignment, when the big boss notified the staff who got the axe.

When it’s your time to go, it’s “Hhello, you’re fired, give us your ID and keys and we’ll escort you out. We’ll go through your desk- and mail you anything that we think is yours.”

A few of the people heading out the door, were retirements. But, others were long-time employees, with skills and institutional knowledge. Something that isn’t valued in the puzzle palace on S. Main St.

Here’s a copy of the email that went out:

From: Collier, Jana (CMG-Dayton)
Sent: Friday, November 06, 2015 4:00 PM
Subject: staffing announcement

Staff –

Today we met with seven employees whose jobs are being eliminated as part of our newsroom downsizing. Each of these journalists has contributed to the success of our company and our brands, and I want to thank and honor each one of them for their work and service.

  • Photographer Jim Witmer
  • Reporter Kelli Wynn
  • Reporter Ken McCall
  • Reporter Dave Larsen
  • Manager Rashida Rawls
  • Manager Ken Paxson
  • Manager Kermit Rowe

Today is their last day in the office. The manager for each impacted team has created a transition plan to ensure continuity for our products and audience.

As we continue to evolve our business, I want to make sure you have the clarity you need to focus on what’s most important, to grow and engage our audience. I am working with the content leadership team to shape and focus our teams to create that clarity; to streamline our processes; and to ensure a strong digital future for each of our brands.

These efforts will require 100 percent from everyone. I need your imagination and dedication as we move forward. We’ll have staff meetings in the next two weeks to present plans and to get your input. In the meantime, do not hesitate to reach out to your manager, your director or me with specific questions or concerns. Our brands are strong, and the work you do every day is vital to the success of this company and to this community.

Thank you,

Jana

Missing from this list is Meredith Moss who retired- and supposedly Ken McCall, who is on the list- got a full pension. Not so lucky for the rest.

Rumor has it that one TV person was concerned with her personal safety- in case there are angry reprisals.

Gotta love the corporate buzzword bullshit- of “content leadership team”- which must mean “people who troll the internet to find things to publish to create page views” and the “strong digital future” where people actually view our shitty ads on our shitty sites.

When you have people who don’t understand news, journalism, or the city of Dayton- you get what they have, a “newspaper in name only.”

Now, it has 8 less names for bylines on an already thin news hole.

Thank Al Gore for the Internet- and Steve Jobs for the iPad -so I can still read a real newspaper everyday- the New York Times.

Best wishes to those jettisoned. May your careers all take off now that you don’t work for the evil empire.

 

The hole on Ludlow Street

Photo by David Esrati of the demolition of the Dayton Daily News building 1923 addition

The day after demolition was allowed to continue

Last week the Dayton Daily news had the sad, sad story of poor Steve Rauch who didn’t get paid for tearing down a perfectly good historic building. No mention of performance bonds- which is the norm for projects like this:

The company that demolished parts of the historic Dayton Daily News building at 45 S. Ludlow St. has sued Student Suites Dayton LLC for allegedly not paying its nearly $800,000 bill.

The civil lawsuit filed Thursday in Montgomery County Common Pleas Court by Steve Rauch Inc. seeks financial damages and a foreclosure on the mechanic’s Lien against Student Suites Dayton (SSD), which originally planned to build a 350-unit, $18 million housing complex that could serve Sinclair Community College students.

Steve Rauch told this newspaper last week that he stopped working on the project when the billing cost for his work hit $869,000 and he still hadn’t been paid.A demolition contract between Student Suites Dayton LLC and Steve R. Rauch Inc. specifies a payment of $1.292 million. Rauch said he stopped working on the project because he hadn’t been paid.

“What a mess that place is down there, isn’t it?” he said. “I’ve liened it — against Student Suites. They haven’t paid me a dime.”

Rauch said he initially held off on filing a lawsuit, hoping to get paid as the project moves forward. “We are not the bad guy that put a bullet in the deal,” he said.

Through an email, Student Suites Dayton declined to comment.The suit alleged Rauch performed all demolition of the former Dayton Daily News and Schwind buildings, and related services. The cost, $775,195, has been due since Jan. 21, 2014, the lawsuit alleges. Interest of 10 percent per annum on the principal has been accruing since then, according to the suit.

Rauch’s attorney, Gregory Page, said the total owed, including interest, is more than $900,000.

“Based on SSD’s ongoing refusal to pay the sums due and owing, Rauch caused multiple affidavits for mechanic’s lien to be recorded against the property,” the suit alleges. “SSD’s actions, including, but not limited to, its failure or refusal to pay the sums due to Rauch, constitute a breach of contract.

”Besides compensatory damages and pre- and post-judgment interest of 10 percent, Rauch seeks attorney fees and costs, and for a judgment ordering the property to be foreclosed and sold. He is also asking that the plaintiff’s liens be paid from the proceeds of the sale.

The city of Dayton, which originally committed $1 million toward the project, increased that to $1.215 million in April 2014. The city’s share went toward demolition and cleanup of the former Schwind Building property.

Aaron Sorrell, Dayton’s director of planning and community development, said at the time that the money was from additional grants, not city general funds.

Complications arose over the Schwind Building, which was demolished in 2013.

A deed restriction imposed by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development limited use of the property to low-income housing, and the Students Suites project did not qualify.

Sorrell also said then that the Student Suites project was delayed because the developer could not obtain financing for it as a result of the deed restriction.

The plan to rejuvenate the area for housing while leaving the original Dayton Daily News “bank” building — which is on the National Register of Historic Places — was announced in April 2013.

Source: Ludlow housing project halted

Considering that Rauch also “mistakenly” tore down a part of the historic part of the Dayton Daily news building that was supposed to stay, the developer could counter-sue, that Rauch damaged the viability of the project. Of course, the fact that Student Suites probably asked him to do it by “accident” won’t come out until the gloves come off in the courtroom.

Normally, in order to do demolition of any sort- there is a required performance bond- so as to make sure the job gets completed. Someone in City Hall should be getting fired over this, but since that someone is either Aaron Sorrell, or Acting City Manager Shelley Dickstein, no one is saying anything. After all, they engineered this cluster-duck.

Of course, I did a FOIA request on who got paid what by the city. I’m not a full time journalist, but lucky for us, the Dayton Daily news hasn’t fired Steve Bennish- their last remaining reporter with a brain, and he’s coming out with a long piece in tomorrow’s paper (available online this morning).

What bothers me, is that his answers from City Hall don’t match the ones I got.

Here is my request- and my follow up- with their answers:

From: David Esrati
Sent: Monday, October 26, 2015, 10:27 a.m.
To: Bankston, Toni
Subject: FOIA request-

Toni,
I talked to Stan Early about this on Sat. morning-
I want to find out the status of:
“The city of Dayton, which originally committed $1 million toward the project, increased that to $1.215 million in April 2014. The city’s share went toward demolition and cleanup of the former Schwind Building property.
Aaron Sorrell, Dayton’s director of planning and community development, said at the time that the money was from additional grants, not city general funds.”

Were the funds released? To whom? Whom were they supposed to go to?

Thank you

Her response:

On Oct 28, 2015, at 12:10, Freeman, Angela wrote:

Mr. Esrati:

Please be advised that the funds came from the Moving Ohio Forward Grant, which was used to demolish vacant and foreclosed properties.  We expended a total of $183,591.37.  The funds went to Student Suites to finish the demolition of the Schwind Building.

Angela Freeman | Executive Secretary | City of Dayton | Office of Public Affairs |

Hmmm, only $183.5K- to Student Suites.

So, they committed 1.2 million- but only release 182.5K something didn’t sound right.

Try again:

From: David Esrati
Sent: Wednesday, October 28, 2015, 1:24 p.m.
To: Freeman, Angela
Cc: Bankston, Toni
Subject: Re: FOIA request-

So the million was never released?

And a response:

From: Freeman, Angela
10/28/15, 2:37 p.m.
To: David Esrati

In total, $938,591 was expended directly to Student Suites, under our development agreement.  Of that, $183,591.37 was an amendment utilizing MOF funds.  The larger, original balance was from the Development fund and was $755,000.00.

Other expenditures from the City were:

$220,000 to CityWide

$25,000 to Schwind Building Restoration Project

Who was the “Schwind Building Restoration Project” that got $25K and what did the taxpayers get back?

Who is asking about what CityWide did with almost a quarter of a million? And why aren’t they liable for the hole in the ground?

Why didn’t the city sue Student Suites- who got $183.5K and left us with a hole in the ground?

You think these questions would be answered in the Dayton Daily news piece coming tomorrow from Steve Bennish? But, no.

The best line in Bennish’s piece:

The city of Dayton, which owned the former Schwind building next door and agreed to have it demolished despite a deed restriction and lien on the property, now admits that was a mistake.

Source: Funding problems, legal woes stall downtown Dayton project | www.mydaytondailynews.com

 Because the city allowed a project to be rushed through, before financing was arranged and a development contract in place- the historic Cox building is now sitting rotting.
From the DDn:

A breakdown of city of Dayton expenditures also shows the city has spent $938,591 on the project. That doesn’t include $420,000 the city spent to pay off liens on the Schwind building, which has been torn down.

More city spending could follow. Dayton Interim City Manager Shelly Dickstein is concerned that another round of winter weather could damage the historic former newspaper building.

“We’ve looked at the cost to fill the hole so it’s not sitting there blighting the community and so that the building could be buttoned up and not exposed,” Dickstein said.

Rauch estimates the cost to finish the demolition would be $500,000 — to remove basement walls and fill in holes.

So now the demolition costs are up to $1.75 million.

The crazy part- this exceeds the cost projections former local developer Bill Rain had estimated to turn the Schwind into housing for students and still comply with the HUD restriction, but the city wouldn’t offer to help at all, finally forcing him out of the deal which he was given hope on by his “friend” Steve Budd at CityWide. Rain was going to use the DDn building as first floor retail and convert the upper floors of the very solid building into parking for the project. The historic Cox building- would have been adapted use as well.

However, local “power brokers” weren’t paid off, and Rain left for Tampa, where he’s done a series of much larger projects, including the conversion and adaptive reuse of a hospital into a long-term care and assisted living facility. (Full disclosure, Rain is a friend, and a client, I visited the hospital project several times and saw first hand what he did. I also witnessed his work on the St. Clair Lofts and Ice Avenue Lofts in Dayton).

The DDn even admits that they were all excited about these out of town hucksters with their no-money down deal:

The stalled state of the project is a stark contrast to the excitement that accompanied the original announcement from Cox Media Group that “a preliminary plan has been agreed upon for the sale and revitalization of the vacant historic Dayton Daily News building and adjacent property.”

“In addition to the sale of the historic Dayton Daily News’ building and property, Cox Media Group Ohio is contributing $1 million to restore and protect the legacy of the historic building,” the April 2013 announcement said.

The Cox people were most excited, but won’t say this- to get out of the property taxes on their empty building (they also demolished Channel 7 asap to avoid paying property taxes) and to not have to pay the Special Improvement District tax that supports the Downtown Dayton Partnership.

Bennish does manage to get this gem into the story:

In the 2013 announcement, CMGO (Cox Media Group Ohio) said it had been working with the city of Dayton, Student Suites and a California-based nonprofit, United Housing and Community Services Corporation, to finalize a plan to build an $18 million multi-purpose complex on the property. Sinclair was not involved, but once the project was completed its students would have access to housing just a short walk from their classes.

United Housing would own the project “once it was leased up,” said Sorrell.

Attempts to reach United Housing were unsuccessful and there was no listing for the non-profit in a statewide telephone directory.

In a bond document on file with the city of Dayton, United Housing was listed as the borrower of the proceeds of the bonds issued by the port authority.

Student Suites, the document said, “gathers a team of architects, local contractors and financial experts to provide a completely finished project.”

Note the part about “bonds issued by the port authority”- yet earlier in the article Jerry Brunswick (withdrawn school board candidate), the current straw man in front of the Port Authority (another organization that screws up public money with little oversight):

Jerry Brunswick, president of the Dayton-Montgomery County Port Authority, said in the early stages of the project the plan was for the authority to issue tax-exempt bonds to finance up to $15 million. The bonds would be sold through an investment banker.

“I never heard that the (bankers’) investment committee approved it,” Brunswick said. “And we asked. We were told they never approved it. If there was a lien in front of the property, it would certainly impede a positive credit decision.”

He added: “A lien in front of you is not a great way to sell a project. The project still makes sense. We’d like to issue the bonds and we have a new program that can be a part of this.”

Uh, if it had a lien on it then, and now it has a lawsuit and an unfinished hole, I’d say this deal is dead.

Bennish briefly covered the buildings’ history- but, that back story is full of the institutional knowledge that is needed to really understand how we got to where we were today.

With the long-shuttered Arcade across the street, the Student Suites project was seen as a ray of hope for that part of downtown and possibly a catalyst for future development. Then came a snag.

A major legal hurdle involved the deed restriction and lien on the Schwind building, which was imploded as part of the development plan. HUD had imposed the restriction after funding a previous owner’s plan to put low-income housing there.

Records show the Schwind had a rough history. The city originally acquired the building from HUD in 2003 after the owner defaulted on a HUD-insured mortgage. The city transferred the building to Rain & Associates in July 2004, but the building then went into foreclosure and was sold in 2007 through a foreclosure sale to the Schwind Building Restoration Project. The city re-acquired the building in August 2013 as part of the Student Suites project.

The “snag” was fully known and ignored by the city and by Student Suites. This is what we normal working stiffs call incompetence. That Dickstein failed the Wayne Avenue Kroger – with no contract with a tenant before expending over $4 million to aggregate a 12 acre parcel, using multiple rounds of real estate options, blighting the neighborhood wholesale, and spending enormous sums on appraisals, and negotiations should have been the end of her and Sorrell.

Bennish didn’t talk to Rain. The Schwind Building Restoration Project was when Bob Schiffler took over the project. Schiffler had successfully and beautifully done the old Chemineer building at the corner of Fourth and Main- but, soon after they transferred the property to him- PNC took over our beloved local lender, National City Bank- and called his notes- forcing him to sell his beautiful mansion on Oakwood avenue and regroup. The Schwind was ancillary damage.

The education of Aaron Sorrell and Shelley Dickstein at taxpayer expense is getting expensive. Bennish gets this beautiful piece in:

Sorrell acknowledges that the lien and deed restriction were raised by Student Suites as a hurdle to financing, but he said the developer redesigned the project to make the Schwind site part of a second phase that would kick in when the lien was removed.

“We’ll take responsibility for the HUD lien,” Sorrell said. “But the developer has struggled to find financing.”

Dickstein too acknowledged that the city made mistakes. “Looking in the rear view mirror, the project moved forward without financing in place,” she said. “In hindsight, we would change things.”

Maybe the reason the developer has trouble finding financing is because it’s really hard to do much in Dayton or even Montgomery County, due to it having the second highest tax burden in the state? Add to that, the additional tax to support the Downtown Dayton Partnership which gets away with no blame on this mess. Lenders aren’t bullish on doing any renovations in Dayton- or the use of Historic Tax credits to finance them- not a single one has worked since the Cannery- and that went into foreclosure as well- despite a very high rental occupancy rate. (Rain was one of the initial developers in that project- but left early when it was pretty clear that his partners, Beth Duke and Dave Williams had a different vision. Williams, by the way, after flopping a big project in Clayton, got hired by CityWide).

Before he died, Alan Rinzler once told me that he owned the only building in the central business district (the Talbot Tower) that hadn’t been foreclosed on). This is how damaged the Downtown real estate market is.

Considering the city has been going to town issuing tickets to home owners in South Park for peeling paint (I completed painting 3 of my houses this summer)  it’s crazy that this boondoggle hasn’t brought the wrath of Nan onto someone (I’m pretty sure my neighbors are paying for my sins).

A contract between Student Suites and the city required Student Suites to provide the city “with a fully executed copy of a payment and performance bond issued by a surety authorized to do business in Ohio and acceptable to the city … which bond will guarantee completion of the developer’s obligations under this agreement and payment in full of all contractors, material suppliers and others who contribute to the design and construction of the project.”

Student Suites has not provided proof of the performance bond, Sorrell said, although it did pay to insure the demolition activities.

The city’s Housing Inspection Division last year issued a violation to Students Suites ordering the LLC to remove trash and debris from the area. The city says there was no response to the order, which was sent by registered mail to Student Suites’ Independence, Mo., offices.

Whoa, wait- the demolition permit was issued before the proof of performance bond was filed on a project this big? And Sorrell still has a job?

The final chilling end to Bennish’s piece, suggest more of our tax dollars will go to prop up this clusterduck:

Dayton officials are now working to see how they can at least secure the building from the weather before winter arrives.

“We are very concerned about getting it done in the next month or so,” Dickstein said. “With the freeze and rain there is exposure on the historic building. It’s an important project and we want to see it be successful.”

If no one comes to the table, Dickstein said, “We will explore our abilities to move forward with enforcement action on the historic building and move forward to preserve the building and remove the blight and fill in the hole in the ground.”

A good start would be firing Sorrell and Dickstein, and then liquidating CityWide Development to pay for the fixes, and then dismantle the Downtown Dayton Partnership and start returning the tax to the property owners. Those who want the common area maintenance performed by the “Ambassadors” (minimum wage workers in green shirts hired by an out-of-state firm)  can band together to hire their own street sweepers.

Then, maybe, we can learn to leave the development to the private sector and concentrate on providing basic city services like plowing snow and collecting leaves, and hanging basketball nets on city courts.

Dayton Daily news to make cuts tomorrow

As if losing your job doesn’t suck enough, those fine folks at Cox Media- who have a million dollars to donate to Dayton’s Whitewater- announced last week that they would be cutting jobs this week.

Word is that more reporters are being shown the door, a photographer and a few managers.

Considering they barely publish much in the way of original news now, one can only wonder what will be left.

Trained monkeys can run articles handed to them about how great the Dayton Development Coalition, Sinclair, UDRI, and assorted other sacred cows are.

Yet, they keep saying they are making money, selling ads no one sees, or wants to look at on their multitude of crappy digital properties.

If anyone had a brain there, the integration of radio, TV, print would have one super site that works.

Yet, they continue to launch new sites to increase their page views and hence their crap-ad count.

Best wishes to those who leave. Maybe all of your careers will blossom once you leave the mushroom factory. Look at what leaving did for Larry Price.

 

 

Maybe the Dayton Daily should have kept its photo editor?

Larry C. Price had already won the Pulitzer prize twice for photojournalism before he came to the Dayton Daily news to be its photo editor. He ran a tight shop, with about 8 full-time photojournalists. That was until they asked him to fire half the staff- and he took a stand and said, well, find someone else to do your bitch work, I’m out of here.

I broke the story to global attention when it happened, and Larry and I became friends. We swap gear, work on some projects together, and he drinks a lot of coffee across the table from me.

Today, he texted with good news- he’s been nominated for an Emmy award. Remember, this guy wasn’t a videographer- but a photo guy.

Here’s his post off Facebook:

I’m stunned! I just learned the story I filmed last year for PBS NewsHour on underwater mining in the Philippines was nominated for an Emmy Award today! It’s one of five finalists in the investigative reporting category for a regularly scheduled broadcast. Winners will be announced in New York in September, but just being nominated has me stoked. This was a very satisfying story to do since it resulted in legislation in the Philippines Parliament that now outlaws this type of mining activity. No doubt lives will be saved.

And here are the details from the Emmy awards site:

PBS NewsHour                                                                                                    PBS
Hazardous Work: Diving into the Philippines’ Dangerous Underwater Mines
Executive Producer
Linda Winslow
Senior Producer
Justin Kenny
Producer
Frank Carlson
Correspondent
Hari Sreenivasan
Investigative Reporter
Larry Price

Via Emmyonline.

The folks at the Dayton Daily news weren’t that bright when they cut the photo department. They may not be able to put those lovely photos by Jim Witmer, or Lisa Powell in their tiny pathetic news hole, but, with their continuous trolling for click bait on Facebook- a good image can make all the difference as people scroll through their news feed.

Larry hasn’t been lacking for work since going solo- traveling the globe shooting his series on child labor. Now his work is getting the recognition it deserves, and the Dayton Daily…. well, isn’t doing much but chasing police cars, ambulances and the occasional here’s how the idiots we help elect waste your money stories.

I prefer Larry’s form of journalism any day. He’s making a difference.

Congrats Larry!

Loss of institutional knowledge at Dayton Daily news showing

A good friend thanked me for posting about the passing of two former candidates for the Dayton City Commission. I didn’t write much- but, both times, the following day, the paper had a decent send-off for these past leaders. Granted, both of them died way too young (55, 53) but, by no means should they have received more ink than this man- Tom Wilson. The sum total of the obit that I could find in the DDn is this:

KETTERING —

Former Montgomery County Sheriff Lewis “Tom” Wilson died Friday, a day after his 86th birthday.

Wilson, of Kettering, served as sheriff from 1979 to 1987.

Funeral visitation is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 4, followed by the funeral services at 2 p.m. at the Kettering Routsong Funeral home, 2100 E. Stroop Road.

via Former sheriff Tom Wilson dies at 86 | www.mydaytondailynews.com. Posted: 6:26 p.m. Sunday, March 30, 2014

No photo, no recollections, no noted accomplishments- just what amounts to the same as a death notice.

From the paid death notice:

WILSON, Lewis Thomas Of Dayton, Ohio, died peacefully in his apartment at One Lincoln Park on March 28, 2014, the day after celebrating his 86th birthday. Tom was the 5th born to Russell and Madeline Wilson of Falmouth Ky. on March 27th, 1928. His family moved to Dayton where he graduated from Wilbur Wright HS in 1946. While there, Tom lettered in football and track, worked as a lifeguard at NCR’s Old River, and met Lois Joan Anderson whom he was married to for 54 yrs. After high cchool, he got a job with NCR as a key bank setter where he saved up enough money to pay for his first year at UD and was awarded a football scholarship. Tom would soon find his calling and spend a total of 37 years in law enforcement. He served 8 years with Oakwood and graduated from the FBI National Academy. Tom then served 19 years as chief deputy sheriff and 10 years as sheriff of Montgomery County from 1978 to 1988. He was past president of the FBI National Academy Association of Ohio, the Buckeye State Sheriffs Association, Law Enforcement Officers Association of Montgomery County, Ohio-Indiana Police Association, S.W. Ohio Police and Sheriffs Association and was awarded the Ohio’s Outstanding Sheriff’s Award in 1981. His involvement and lifelong contributions to the Dayton community are many where he has served as past president of the Dayton Agonis Club and on the boards for AAA, Goodwill Industries, Dayton Boys/Girls Club, Kiwanis Club, Easter Seals, Camp Fire Council, and Old Time Newsies. He was past master of George Marshall Lodge which became Far Hills Lodge #784, a member of the York Rite Bodies, a 33rd degree Scottish Rite Mason, Royal Order of Jesters, and a past potentate of the Antioch Shrine Temple. Most of all, Tom was deeply dedicated to his family and numerous friends and always strived to deliver an unsurpassed level of excellence in all that he did. Tom was predeceased by his wife, Lois in 2003. She was the love of his life. He is survived by his very dear loving companion, June Mathewson of Centerville, OH; son, Joseph C. Wilson of West Carrollton, OH; 2 daughters, Penny Ellis of Boulder Creek, Calif., and Wendy McArdle of Bristol, Vt.; 2 grandsons, Jason Wilson and Alex Ellis; 2 granddaughters, Caroline McArdle, Jenna McArdle; 2 great grandchildren and a host of loving nieces and nephews. A Masonic service will be held at 1:45 p.m., with a memorial service to follow at 2:00 p.m., Friday, April 4, 2014, at Routsong Funeral Home, 2100 E. Stroop Rd. in Kettering. The family will greet friends in the funeral home from 10:00 a.m. to 1: p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Antioch Building Corp., 107 E. First St., Dayton, OH 45402 or The Dayton Masonic Foundation for the Scottish Rite Learning Center, PO Box 932, Dayton, OH 45401. Condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.routsong.com

Published in Dayton Daily News on Apr. 2, 2014
– See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dayton/obituary.aspx?pid=170459471#sthash.uj8Jvzy1.dpuf

In the past, the DDn has been criticized for not remembering D-Day, Pearl Harbor Day, MLK Day, etc.- so they make sure to give ample coverage- but, that’s not really news in our community, that’s fluff. A man whp served in our community as the highest elected lawman for a decade, deserved more.

The fact is, with all the “retirements” and cutbacks- the Dayton Daily news institutional knowledge base is minimal. They don’t know the history, the connections, the reason 2+2 often only equals 3 in this community.

My father chastised me for writing about the death notices- and calling them failed obits. I’m pretty sure, had I not written about them, the DDn wouldn’t have either. To Tom Wilson, and all his friends- and I’m sure he had way more friends than I’ll ever have, he deserved better. I’m sorry I didn’t catch it. And to TP, thanks for pointing this out.