Money may not buy happiness, but it might buy a politician

The pre-election campaign finance reports were due yesterday. I hope to have the complete McLin and Whaley reports online early next week- because, they won’t publish anything truly informative on their sites.

From the Dayton Daily News today:

McLin declared contributions of just more than $51,862, from about 170 supporters, including $10,000 from Kitt C. Cooper of Westerville. Cooper is the owner of Vance Environmental, LTD, a construction, demolition company, which also owns the landfill on Vance Road.

“He’s a good guy, more than the owner of a landfill, he’s part of the conversation about Dayton,” McLin said. “He has great ideas for the landfill, after it closes.”

McLin also had several supporters associated with the Kettering Health Network who made personal contributions, including CEO Frank Perez giving $2,000 and Roy Chew, president of Kettering Medical Center, who gave $1,000….

Leitzell has held several grassroots, fund-raising events including a pancake breakfast and a pie sale, but said he did not meet the requirement to file a campaign finance report…

Of the three candidates for Dayton City Commission, only Nan Whaley filed a finance report by Friday.

Whaley has received contributions totaling $22,741, with Kitt Cooper also being her largest donor at $5,000.

Neither City Commissioner Joey Williams or commission candidate David Esrati filed finance reports.

via McLin, Whaley lead money race for mayor, city commission campaign.

Both McLin and Whaley have in recent years become supporters of tearing down vacant homes in Dayton, so who appears as the largest donor to both McLin and Whaley’s campaign? Not surprisingly, the owner of a landfill/demolition company.  In yesterday’s post I had predicted a large donation from the demolition contractor with the current city contract, but it turns out that the biggest donor to Whaley and McLin is another demolition contractor.  It will be interesting to see who gets the next city contract.

When I very first ran for Mayor several years ago, I questioned where an incumbent’s campaign money was coming from and specifically asked if it indeed came from someone who wanted to build a landfill on the West side.  That donor got their landfill, and that landfill is fast becoming, quite literally, the highest point in Dayton.  The topography may change, the names may change, but the game is still the same.  The way Dayton has been led for years is that big donors often get big city contracts.  And with the hundreds of demolished homes that the current Mayor and Commission have added to it, a landfill may soon become, quite unfortunately for the people of Dayton,  the Mayor’s and this Commission’s most enduring legacy.

It’s time for candidates who are free to do what’s best for the City and its people- not special interests that make large campaign donations.

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