Residency and stupidity

If Commissioner Whaley was really doing business when she conducted her “survey” of police and fire employees about residency, why didn’t she do it through official channels?

Hopefully, the City of Dayton does have e-mail? Telephone surveys are so last century to begin with.

Here are the pertinent parts of the Dayton Daily News article on this breech of privacy by Ms. Whaley:

The Wright State University graduate student given home numbers and addresses of police and firefighters, which were to be used to conduct a residency survey, is a Dayton city commissioner.

Nan Whaley, the commissioner, was given the information for college study, according to documents the Dayton Daily News obtained Friday, May 1.

The personal information of police and firefighters appears under a “Must Not Release” section of the state Sunshine laws.

The decision to release the records angered police and fire union officials, who said Whaley used her position as a commissioner to gain access to the records.

City Manager Rashad Young said information used in the survey was released for “business reasons” and is “not applicable” to state Sunshine laws.

Randy Beane, Dayton police union president, said, “I wholeheartedly disagree with that and it is a bastardization of state law by the city to cover themselves.”

“The commissioner used her position to get the information,” Beane said.

Young and Whaley disagreed.

“I am a graduate student conducting a survey about residency and have done nothing unethical or illegal,” Whaley said. “We have been very careful and followed ethical guidelines, like making sure I don’t contact anyone (who is) a part of the survey.”

Tuesday, Attorney General Richard Cordray’s office said the release of information on peace officers is not illegal.

In an April e-mail regarding Whaley’s information request sent to Young, a city employee wrote, “As it relates to address and phone number (of employees), these are no longer public record due to a state law change. I can provide them to Commissioner Whaley for business reasons but she cannot disclose the information.”

About 50 officers who were surveyed were asked about the likelihood of their moving out of the city and where they would move if the state Supreme Court lifted the residency rule, Beane said.

Officers were asked if they would accept a $5,000 payment to stay in the city, how many children they have, and their combined household income.

via Personal data on police, firemen were given to city commissioner.

If the Supreme Court finds the residency rule unconstitutional, this “research” doesn’t matter. As to paying $5,000 to employees to stay in the city, maybe this money should be spent on providing baseball fields to youth leagues instead.

The sad part is that Ms. Whaley is busy thinking about things like keeping employees hostage, instead of ways to make people want to live in our city.

Right now the city isn’t in any position to pay employees more to live in the city (and why should we only be concerned with safety forces?).

What’s even more disconcerting is that a Commissioner has chosen to use her position to secure information that should not, or would not be released to anyone else. This is a serious breech of responsibility on both Ms. Whaley’s part, and the City Manager’s part. However, it’s doubtful that either will suffer any consequences for their actions.

However, one of the comments on the DDN site had at least this part right:

Nannette Whaley (home)
217 Wroe Ave
Dayton, OH 45406-5252
(937) 275-3418
Maybe some one might want to call her for comments??
da man  1:26 PM, 5/2/2009

And for good measure, if you want her cell phone number, leave a comment and ask for it- I’ll e-mail it to you.

Privacy isn’t something to be taken lightly.

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