A Dayton candidates night and a voters fright

Last Wednesday night, instead of working, or doing something fun, I went in for a two hour reminder of why Democracy no longer works in America.

(full disclosure- my firm has done some work and printing for the following candidates or their businesses, Jocelyn Rhynard, Shenise Turner-Sloss, Darryl Fairchild, Karen Wick-Gagnet)

When this country started, it was easy to pick people for elected office. You’d have a town hall of all the white male property owners, they all knew each other, and they chose the people based on personal knowledge and it was done.

Now, we just let anyone on the ballot, at least anyone that can make it through the political parties barricades and hurdles enforced by the board of (S)elections, and then to raise as much money as possible to run for an office that very few of the candidates and even fewer of the voters really understand.

Both the Dayton City Commission and the Dayton Board of Education positions are limited in their actual scope and power. This is by design. They are only allowed to hire a few people, and are there as a corporate board, to guide and review the performance of the leader they hire, be that person called a City Manager or a Superintendent. Instead, we’ve got ego-maniacal demi-gods running who think they not only steer the ship, but also are the guys running the engines, standing guard duty, manning the radar, cooking the food and even scrubbing the decks- all for a mere pittance on the school board and on a salary way richer than it should be for the city commissioners, who only have to show up for one meeting a week.

That said. Sorry about the audio in this video. The PA provided by the City of Dayton at the Northwest Recreation Center badly needed a new XLR cable, but, we’re too busy giving away millions to downtown investors to spring for $15 for a new cable (or less if you go to CCT). I’m even sorrier for what was recorded.

Of the school board candidates, only one actually talked about what we might need to do to change the way we deliver education in the classrooms to move achievement forward- that from Mario Gallin, a former school member who works at Ruskin for East End Community Services and still attends every board meeting. The Ruskin/EECS educational delivery method is based upon the Geoffrey Canada, Harlem Children’s Zone model of comprehensive wrap around services. The only other candidate to mention anything of the like was slate member Paul Bradley who spoke of the Oyler school in Cincinnati which he knows about because his fiancee worked there.

The seating and speaking arrangements were telling. First came “the slate” from the left, then the soloists, who have their own alignments, and the sole incumbent, Joe Lacey who cited parenting duties for calling him away and leaving early. Then the Commission candidates, less Joey Williams. In an unprecedented concession, Priority Board Chairman David Greer allowed Jeff Mims to have Williams time allotment, which judging by Mims reactions to questioning the city’s loss of funds due to internal errors, was a mistake. Mims got defensive and blamed the mess on former planning director Aaron Sorrel, which Darryl Fairchild was quick to call him on. Somehow, despite massive failures in her past, City Manager Shelley Dickstein always gets a hall pass, no matter how much taxpayer money is wasted, and the city commission is never to blame either.

The “slate” is four candidates running together for the school board. Insiders believe them to be hand-picked by Mayor Nan Whaley. Mohamed Al-Hamdani, William E. Harris Jr., Paul Bradley, and Karen Wick-Gagnet have hired a campaign manager (Nan’s old campaign manager) Uriah Anderson, who works for the ever popular Burges & Burges out of Cleveland. They are the folks Sinclair and the Health and Human Services levies both hired (hence the dual billboards around town). This kind of money, power and help hasn’t been seen since the “Kids First” slate ran in 2001 with the sole goal of putting a ton of money into the hands of demolition contractors, construction companies, architects and adding a $645 Million jolt to an ailing Dayton economy.

If you want to read an interesting excerpt on Kids First, follow this link. They spent over $200K on a campaign where all their opponents collectively spent $13,000 between 5 candidates. Note that the four seats that are up this time- were filled by unopposed candidates (Lacey, Roundtree, Lee and Baguirov). The last cycle, we had 4 candidates for 3 seats, and newcomer John McManus spent north of $35K to unseat Nancy Nearny by a mere couple of hundred votes forcing an automatic recount, while the other incumbents Walker and Taylor waltzed on in.

When asked (by me, via Chairmen Greer) why the slate hired an outside consultant, and how much they paid them, the room seemed to turn on Mohamed Al-Hamdani who tried to pass off the question with “we haven’t paid them anything yet” – while defacto saying their campaign manager worked for Burges. The slate is keeping quiet about how much they’ve raised or spent, and because the first reporting deadline isn’t until Oct 28th- the voters will have very little time to learn who is buying their candidates and for how much.

Needless to say, if you look back to the Kids First promises, and the whys, the district is in the exact same sorry shape now as then. Still at the bottom of the barrel for educational achievement, yet with a much higher staff turnover, more turmoil, a third less students, funded by an ever shrinking property tax base (often thanks to Nan Whaley and her love of tax abatement as economic development). The only difference between that slate and this one is that the Kids First slate actually would openly embrace charter schools, while anyone running for school board now has to categorically blame them for the failing of the district.

I still plan to listen to the candidates again, yet, I threw up a little when I heard Reverend Harris saying that he was going to concentrate on truancy as his platform. This is the simpletons solution to educational improvement- and why I also laughed at Dr. Roberson’s entire presentation of his case for why he should be superintendent. The other single issue candidate seems to be Jo’el Jones, who thinks all of our problems can be solved by the office of family and community engagement rising from the ashes. I agree it’s needed, but, it won’t solve the problems of this sinking ship.

While there is no doubt more to Jocelyn Rhynard than her four kids in the district, and her involvement in her kids school, River’s Edge, I didn’t feel she had a fully formed plan and was way too nice in her response about how she’d work with current superintendent Rhonda Corr. Going back to being on the campaign trail with former Dayton City Commissioner Dick Zimmer, it’s always bothered me that procreation counted as qualification for office- he’d start out with “I was born in Dayton, grew up in Dayton, had 9 kids and 19 grandchildren” – as if he chose where to be born, grow up. Mim’s also tells the same sorry story about how he told his family to move to Dayton when he was 3 months old. Rhynard, like Gallin, actually attends school board meetings regularly. Jo’el Jones is also sometimes there. I’ve never seen any of the slate attend.

We need more than platitudes and feel good stories- which is also part of Mohamed’s approach. He’s got a great story to tell of how he came as an immigrant and Dayton’s been good to him, but, he moved back into the city the same day he filed to run, a part he conveniently leaves out.

Hopefully, in the Wednesday night Dayton Education Council candidates night at Ponitz High school (741 W. Washington Street) – starting at 6pm we’ll here speeches sounding more like cogent solutions to stop the turmoil, turnover and terrible achievement scores instead of homilies and grand standing.

If any candidates need an example of what a plan to improve school/student performance looks like, I offer this video I made last December to make a case for a trans-formative plan to discussion. Of course, since no one on the board cares about anything except their own agenda- it was never discussed.

If you are looking to research candidates online- here are the websites I can find:

Of course in most of my searches, more shows up about many of these folks on esrati.com.

Thanks for reading.

Human Services levy needs conditions

It’s time to have a very frank discussion of this whole integrated county human services levy- and where the money goes.

Yes, we need to provide human services- but, when much of the work is subcontracted out to “non-profits” – it’s time to redefine what a “non-profit” is- and I’m going to say that neither CareSource or Kettering Health Network or Premier Health Partners should be eligible to receive any funding until they put pay restrictions on top management- or start paying property taxes like every other business

Would you spend $150K to get back $5.9 million in revenue? Of course you would- and where is that money coming from? The taxpayers. Note, the executives of just two of the above organizations take home over $7 million a year in income.

From the DDN article:

Much of the $523,915 spent to promote passage of the Montgomery County Human Services Levy (Issue 9) came from organizations that will benefit from passage of the tax issue on the Nov. 2 ballot.

The single largest contributor, The Greater Dayton Area Hospital Association, gave $150,000 to the levy campaign.

Member hospitals share $5.9 million in levy funds annually. That money goes toward the $170 million hospitals collectively incur providing services to the poor, said Bryan Bucklew, president and CEO of the association.

The levy also funds programs for children, the frail elderly, along with people with metal health and addiction issues. Bucklew said without the levy funds “many more people would end up at a hospital.”

Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Services served an estimated 20,000 children and adults in 2009 with $26.8 million in levy funds via agencies such as DayMont Behavioral Health Care, Inc.; Eastway Corporation; Samaritan Behavioral Health Inc. and South Community Inc. Those agencies combined donated $38,760 to the campaign.

via Big Human Services levy donors would benefit from passage.

Is it time to bid these services out? Would the VA health system be a better vendor? Or a county-run free clinic system? Somewhere along the line we need to stop transferring money from the people as taxes to companies that see fit to engage in unfair discriminatory trade practices- like charging lower rates to those with insurance and higher to those without.

I have no problem on paying to help keep our community healthy- I just would feel better if we weren’t being manipulated by large, extremely profitable businesses pretending to be non-profit good guys.

I’ll probably vote for this levy- but, hope that before the next one- voters have required any organization that receives funding to have fair trade policies in place and is not paying any more than a 10-1 ratio for executives to line workers- which should be required for them to claim non-profit status. It’s time that fake non-profits had to pay property taxes too.

The latest ruling that says charter schools have to pay property taxes while public schools don’t- should be the first hint that these large organizations need to be reigned in.

Further reading- who is getting and spending the campaign cash?

The latest campaign finance reports filed Oct. 21, showed the Human Services Levy Campaign had total monetary contributions of $537,096, with a previous balance of $229,854. Nearly $525,000 has already been spent on the 2010 campaign.

The greatest expense: television advertising. Payment of $333,710 went to Dayton-based, Penny Ohlmann Neiman, Inc. for television and magazine ads. It was a Cleveland-based company, Burges and Burges Strategist Inc., who laid out the campaign strategy. The company received payment of $42,184 for their services, then gifted $2,000 back to the campaign.

via Human services levy campaign costly.

Note- this “team” of Burges and Burges along with Penny Ohlmann Neiman seems to almost always get this type of work in town. It never seems to be competitively bid- and why is a Cleveland firm engaged to plan how to sell to Daytonians? Burges also has the no-bid contract with the Dayton Public Schools- how’s their image changed to you?