Judge Skelton ignores the premise of the Open Meetings Act- dismisses case

Today Judge Richard Skelton dismissed the case Esrati vs DPS and Dayton City Commission on imaginary legal precedent.

“However, as indicated in the Court’s decision denying the motion for a preliminary injunction, there is no evidence that any deliberations occurred during the bus tour or any discussion of the prospective closing of school buildings.”

There is no provision in ORC 121.22 to qualify meetings based on if deliberations took place.  Common sense also says, you can’t prove what did or did not happen in a meeting if you can’t enter the room.

The video of the actual actions of the task force was in evidence, but never reviewed. The problem with the OMA is that our legislators in Columbus who wrote it, and then kept adding to it, would flunk the third grade reading guarantee. It’s a bunch of convoluted language with references to penalties that never get handed out- mostly because they really don’t want the public to use it to guarantee open honest government.

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Skelton’s decision. Click to download PDF

I’m not going to recount the whole argument- but, I originally filed to stop the bus tour, because that was pressing. I should have filed a simple OMA case- for all the violations- the attempts to throw me out, the actual keeping me out, the banning of audio and video recording equipment. Those are all punishable violations.

I will appeal the case, and hopefully, smarter judges will understand that laws that are only enforceable by lawyers – to protect the general public from bad behavior of people in power, aren’t really protecting anyone.

It’s too bad Skelton never watched the video evidence that the School board lawyer denied the existence of. Because if he had watched it- a 3rd grader would have seen that there was a violation.

Here’s his decision for summary judgement for the defense.

He should be ashamed.

Judges rule, Superintendents lie on the stand. Chaos as usual for DPS

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Judge Skelton’s decision, click to download full pdf

Judge Richard Skelton issued his ruling around 1:30 today. I was on an airplane headed back to Cincinnati from a quick trip to Tampa.

I went live on Facebook from  the airport, and then spent the trip back to Dayton talking the case over with friends who know mire than me, and calling the Ohio Attorney General’s Open Government Unit.

The decision was a split. I won on the major issue of if the task force was a public body and had to comply with the Open Meetings Act. That was a major hurdle- after the amount of BS the defense threw at the Judge claiming it wasn’t.

However, the judge refused to offer a temporary injunction banning the board from acting on the school closings because he said I failed to prove that the bus tour engaged in deliberations.

First, how could I tell the judge what happened in a meeting I wasn’t allowed to attend?

And, second, since the issue wasn’t subject to the privilege of executive session, the meeting was illegal.

But, Lolli said on the stand, they just observed and got briefed. The Judge created some kind of third kind of meeting- that isn’t defined by law- of an “information gathering session” which he thinks is exempt from public scrutiny. Here he makes an error. The contents of a meeting that isn’t open- and isn’t covered by executive session rules- is illegal. Period. (if any of you want to transcribe her lies, and put the time code of what she says and put it in comments- I’d be very appreciative).

You can watch the video of the court proceedings and hear Lolli use the “noise of the bus” as an excuse to say no discussions took place. Only problem is, the newspaper reporter, Jeremy Kelley of the Dayton Daily News wrote an article that day that said discussion did take place:

When the bus arrived, acting DPS superintendent Elizabeth Lolli said any members of the group who were tied to Dayton city government should not take part in the tour. City Commissioner Jeff Mims said that was because of “legal issues we’re dealing with.”

The remaining members of the task force briefly toured Valerie Elementary’s kitchen, gym/cafeteria, mechanical rooms and one classroom that was not in use. At 52 years old, Valerie is one of the few schools that pre-dates DPS’ building boom of last decade.

Lolli and associate superintendent Sheila Burton gave task force members detailed data on where the students attending each DPS school live, to show population concentrations, and how many students are traveling across the city each day.

As the task force headed back to the bus, Lolli told the group that legal counsel for the school district had advised the task force to stop the remaining school tours.

The group’s bus then drove to the two remaining schools, Meadowdale and Wogaman, stopping in each parking lot for a few minutes to hear information about enrollment numbers and each school’s physical condition. At each stop, one or two task force

members asked questions seeking clarity on the data. But the task force members did not leave the bus, and eventually returned to DPS headquarters.

Source: Dayton schools: Task force halts planned tours after challenge

As far as did they violate the law- it’s obvious they did. Why the judge refuses to stop them from adopting resolutions based on illegal meetings is beyond me.

The board is also trying to hastily hire Libby Lolli tomorrow night at 5pm. I highly recommend all of you come out and suggest that they haven’t done their due diligence or provided the public enough time to review the contract or the terms. Hiring a superintendent in the midst of turmoil is exactly how the last bad decision to hire a superintendent got made.

Esrati files suit to stop school task force from touring in private

Today at 3:06 pm David Esrati filed pro se with the Montgomery County Common Pleas Clerk of Courts a civil action to ask the courts to prevent the Dayton School Closure task force from touring school buildings without public oversight.

The case was initially assigned to Judge Dennis Langer, who had to recuse himself, since his wife, Ellen Belcher, formerly of the Dayton Daily News now does contract work for Learn to Earn and Dr. Tom Lasley who are named in the suit.

The case was sent to Judge Richard Skelton, who took the time to review the pro se filing, but admonished Esrati for not including a Rule 65 Temporary Restraining Order so that he could rule immediately on the case without a jury trial for the good of the public interest.

Esrati then wrote an addendum, to file first thing tomorrow morning, and served the documents to all parties via email.

A few observations, the instructions for how to efile with the Montgomery Clerk of Courts office run 35 pages and the system still takes manual oversight. My new account, won’t even be active for 24 hours, which forced me to go to the clerks office to file in person. So much for the brilliance of our former Clerk of Court Greg Brush. No ecommerce portal should require 35 pages of instruction or a delay. If this court system was online in a bigger jurisdiction, that kind of ineptitude would make the courts inoperable.

The fact that service isn’t possible via electronic means is also embarrassing. Why the courts are supporting FedEx and the US Post office to serve lawsuits that have to be filed electronically, is kind of another way to slow the system and add costs. Considering most filings name lawyers who already are registered with the State, this is a colossal waste of time and money.

Also, the cost of filing was $330.50, for a case which the law only allows for a collection of a $500 penalty per instance. This makes the likelihood of common citizens filing rare. Of course, attorney fees are offered as part of the restitution, guaranteeing that the courts help lawyers keep their jobs, while the laws get overlooked because of artificial hurdles built by the system.

Here are the filings, the first is the injunction, the second is the addition of the Temporary Restraining Order. Hopefully, I can efile in the morning and won’t be charged more money.

The task force is supposed to tour the buildings tomorrow. If the board was smart, they would order the Superintendent to pause the tours until this case has been decided.

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The suit that was filed to stop the task force from touring in private- and to examine it’s legal standing.

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The TRO that will be filed tomorrow to get immediate action.