Nan Whaley’s too busy for you.

Screen capture of Nan Whaley holding page on her siteNot that she posted much on her blog, or responded to input- Nan’s two year experiment with building a community online is over, her blog replaced with a GoDaddy holding page.

Other than getting married and working on her master’s degree at Wright State, Ms. Whaley’s job performance as a Dayton City Commissioner has resulted in minimal impact on the citizens. She has proved herself adept at being a comic foil to the Mayor’s bantering at the end of meetings, but hasn’t championed any cause, initiative, or program. At least Matt Joseph can say he’s created parties for interns with his “Summer in the City” intern program.

Realistically- the last major initiatives that have been championed by a member of the commission (that were actually within their control) are few and far between:

Mayor Mike Turner pushed for brownfield redevelopment programs and demolition standards that stopped the imploding of buildings into the ground for a coverup.

Commissioner Tony Capizzi pushed for baseball- which took place after he left office.

Commissioner Mark Henry championed the well field protection ordinance.

Well meaning, but misplaced efforts go to Dean Lovelace for his living wage and predatory lending protection initiatives.

Totally off base was Tony Capizzi’s local gun ordinance.

Anyone else have nominations for tangible programs championed by a Commissioner or Mayor in the last 25 years?

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1 Response

  1. Jeff August 31, 2007 / 4:31 pm
    The biggest civic failure of the past 25 years was to re-use the Arcade, which would be the centerpiece of a regeneration strategy focused on the core of downtown.

    We should rename those tin turkeys in the Arcade rotunda for the various city managers, mayors, and commissioners and, yes, even private sector types, who dropped the ball on what is arguably the second most signifigant piece of architecture in the city.

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