Did Dayton road construction kill another business? Denny’s to close tomorrow

Although the management out of Cleveland won’t confirm, it’s pretty clear that Denny’s at 1136 S. Main Street is closing tomorrow.

No more late night hangout downtown after everything closes. Nope. Not allowed. Work a long second shift and want to grab a bite at 2 a.m.? Too bad. Not in Nan’s city.

Now, before you go look at the Google reviews, or Yelp or Trip Advisor and say – “yeah, well, they sucked” – you also have to understand the forces they are up against- mainly- a road that no one wanted to drive down for a year plus. It’s hard to keep good help, when business is choked off. Why it took so long to repave a mile of road is a mystery. The Allies landed on the Normandy beachhead and managed to cross 7 major rivers that had the bridges bombed- in less time on their march to Berlin.

Of course, Denny’s doesn’t matter to the City of Dayton. All that matters is Miami Valley Hospital- where the overpaid leadership contributes healthily to the campaign of Mayor Nan. Or UD, or Miller Valentine. Or GE, or Emerson- or other companies that either don’t pay property taxes, or get huge tax-abatement gifts- in exchange for the promise of higher-paying jobs for people who can’t vote in the city because they live in the ‘burbs for the most part. Denny’s hired Dayton residents. Jobs. Not great ones- but, every job and every business should matter.

There was a lot of second guessing about what the city should have done to keep NCR in Dayton- but, no one will wonder what Dayton should have done to keep Denny’s.

Before the construction of the building on Brown that now houses Hot Head Burritos, Ginger & Spice and Subway, a small developer wanted to put an IHOP in that was going to be a 24-hour establishment- just like Denny’s. The hospital and the “Fairgrounds neighborhood” fought it. Noise complaints. Safety complaints.  Never mind the helicopters at all hours of the night. The developer was being told they’d have to hire an off-duty Dayton cop around the clock. Screw it. He stopped doing business in the city.

The real test will be to see what happens to the empty building. If the hospital buys it- or if someone else has their fingers in it already. It’s registered to BGZ Investments out of Addington, Texas, on the super slow Montgomery County auditor’s site (thanks Tyler Technologies). In the 15 years available on the site- the tax value has climbed from $390,400 to $460,530 despite the building being in pretty sad shape. Since 1999, they’d paid $250,799.40 in property taxes.

Best of luck to the employees in finding new jobs. Some of them had been there for a really long time.

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