Complete list of candidates for Congress in OH-10, Montgomery, Greene and Fayette County

by David Esrati on February 19, 2012

in Ohio 10 congressional district, primary, The Dayton Daily News isn't your friend

In today’s Dayton Daily News we get their first and perhaps last attempt to cover the candidates.

A short bio provided by the candidates, a candidate-supplied picture and answers to two questions. This is a voter’s guide- not reporting. No reporter has called, they sent a reporter to one candidates night where no story was written (I did mention him in this post about the event, with full video coverage).

There is no commenting function on the DDN site- so we’ll have have the conversation here.

Here are the responses by the Dems:

U.S. Rep. 10th District (Dem)

This district covers Montgomery and Greene counties and part of Fayette County

All candidates were asked to answer these questions:

Question 1: How will you deal with the continuing costs of military actions and the costs of domestic needs?

Question 2: What are the most important issues in this race?

David Esrati

Website: www.electesrati.com note- while this is the campaign site, you are on my site that I’ve maintained since 2005 discussing local issues.

Bio: Small business owner, Veteran, activist, Marketing degree from WSU. Active in politics since he bought his home in 1986. Rehabbed 5 buildings and has been a driving force in the South Park neighborhood renaissance. DBJ 40 under 40

Answer 1: Simply: pull all conventional forces out of Afghanistan and Iraq. Don’t start a new war with Iran. Begin charging South Korea, Japan, all of NATO for our defensive services- or pull our military from foreign soil. Stop hiring civilian contractors to do the military’s job- paying a contractor 4x what we pay our troops for doing the same job, with questionable legal protection is criminal. Our future is in special operations, which need increased funding. The F35, a 12-carrier fleet and a huge nuclear stockpile are unnecessary. War is now asymmetrical; we need to adapt.

Answer 2: Campaign finance reform is critical. We’re running auctions instead of elections selling favors to the high-dollar donors. Yet the public had to bail out the massive failures of Wall Street wizards and the false prophet CEOs. It’s criminal that Jeff Immelt of GE sits on the president’s council, yet GE pays less in corporate taxes than it spends on lobbying. There is only one way to create jobs, have the federal government stop doing business with companies that pay their CEOs more than 35x what they pay their average U.S. worker, at least until unemployment is below 5%.

Ryan Steele

Website: www.steeleforrep.com  as of today- the site is still a go-daddy holding page.

Bio: I’m 28 and I currently deliver pizzas. I recently earned a Bachelor’s in Liberal Arts from Wright State University, majoring in Religious Studies, with a minor in Philosophy. My wife Laura and I have been married for almost two years.

Answer 1: It is my belief that the U.S. can reduce its military spending and still remain the world’s strongest military force. The focus of our military spending should be on the soldiers and on veteran benefits. We must also avoid getting involved in unnecessary military actions. Domestically, “entitlement” programs must be protected from both those trying to end the programs, and from those who abuse them; but ensuring that people don’t starve, freeze, or die of curable diseases should always be our top priorities. A new tax structure, such as the “Fair Tax,” will likely be necessary to fund future spending.

Answer 2: There is one issue in this country which I believe trumps all other issues; gridlock. Currently, Congress won’t confirm Presidential nominees; it won’t compromise to produce legislation to help hurting people; and it can’t go four months without almost shutting down the government. But they did manage to decide that pizza is a vegetable; bravo Congress. Incidentally, as a pizza delivery guy, I can assure you that pizza isn’t a vegetable. The 10th district needs to send someone to Washington with a mandate to break up the gridlock. Until this happens, none of our other problems will ever get solved.

Olivia Freeman

Website: www.liv2012.com

Bio: Born to a military family, I served stateside during Vietnam.  A Wright State Alum,  I’ve traveled to Eastern Europe and Africa to promote education.  Using my marketing and workforce development skills, I help small businesses grow.

Answer 1:

The people must be better informed in world affairs before voting on involvement and without giving our hand away, be kept in the loop. Cut the military to a “surgical staff” which is supported by civilian contractors will increase competitiveness and transparency. Demographic analysis indicates we have enough money to pay for SS and Medicare, et al. The “fire sale” of 2008 was a money laundering scheme transferring ownership and profits to foreign corporations. We must close that gate, then increase global market penetration. Let’s bring manufacturing into the 21st century and provide everything, everywhere and bring “our” money home.

Answer 2: People need a  “workhorse” not a show horse.  I encourage rural and urban intra-district monetary circulation. I created:  9 Square which funds community programming by granstmanship training  to   2-3 people from every organization to fulfill their missions. The new Ohio Science Alliance will  prepare folks for 21st Century preeminence so everyone gets workforce training, utilizing our science centers and simulation technologies. Weekend Business Bootcamps will start hundreds of new businesses and put thousands of people to work in these vacant buildings across the district and hopefully spawn new industries as well.

And I have the experience to make it happen.

L. Mack VanAllen

Website: www.vanallenforcongress.com

Bio: I am married with children and have lived in the Miami Valley for my adult life. A retired high school government teacher, I hold two degrees from Miami University and a MS in Economics from the University of Missouri.

Answer 1: As for the military, I will strongly advocate for programs currently housed at Wright-Patterson AFB. These programs are essential for our 21st Century military obligations and are indispensable to the economic vitality of the Miami Valley. Domestically, I support social programs that expand opportunity. I also believe a society is judged by how it cares for those least capable. With funding tight, these are two areas that should be prioritized. Future funding considerations must occur within the context of their overall fiscal impact. To impose discipline on the appropriations process, I would support a pay as you go approach.

Answer 2: The most important issue is the debt we have amassed and the promises we have made. Negotiations must commence immediately. All stakeholders must have a place at the table in these negotiations and be willing to compromise. All possible approaches must be considered, including program adjustments and elimination, as well as revenue enhancements. And above all, the strident, self-serving tone that has possessed Congress over the past year needs to cease when doing the people’s business. Resolving this fiscal issue will create an atmosphere of certainty, and spark the resurgence of vigorous economic growth and dynamic job creation.

Thomas F. McMasters

Website: http://McMasters4congress.com

Bio: Husband and proud father of five. Retired AF officer, C-141 navigator, AF Academy Prep School Instructor, X-45 Pilot, Research Scientist, and Test and Evaluation manager. Masters of Arts in Teaching (mathematics) and BS in Physics. Adjunct Faculty member Sinclair Community College.

Answer 1: The preferred method of reducing the costs of military action is to not engage in one unnecessarily. You can tell from my summer of 2003 web post “Thank God for Senator Robert Byrd” I knew even then the invasion of Iraq was a bad decision. I’ll take that same superior judgment to Congress.

One of the many avenues for reducing the cost of government is to change the mindset of commanders and department heads that lead them to spend to budget. Budgets must take inflation into account. Expenditures should reflect value. Change the mindset and save 10% this year.

Answer 2: The single most important issue in this race is to maximize the number of informed voters. To regain our stride toward national prosperity we must put our financial house in order. This is a complicated equation of the right taxes, smart regulations and a national commitment that demands we invest brain power to implement the best solution. Four months before Petraeus became commander in Iraq, I outlined the premise of our involvement with the “Iraqi Awakening”. In 2009 I proposed the President’s latest housing solution. To ensure our highest standard of living, voters should be knowledgeable when choosing a candidate.

Sharen Swartz Neuhardt

Website: www.neuhardtforcongress.com

Bio: Life-long Ohioan, daughter of a Dayton policeman, granddaughter of a city firefighter. Grew up in Northwest Dayton, attended Dayton public schools, graduated from Northwestern University and Georgetown law school, and returned to Dayton to practice business law at Thompson Hine LLP.

Answer 1: The federal government needs to get its house in order. We need to raise revenues by growing our economy and by reforming our income tax system. We need to cut our national debt. If we spend everyone’s tax dollars more wisely and efficiently, there is no reason why we can’t have a strong defense and attend to our domestic needs as well. Our troops and tax dollars should be committed to military actions only as a last resort and only when the objectives are well-defined.

Answer 2: This race will be about jobs, restoring our economic security, and protecting and strengthening Miami Valley workers and families. We also need new voices to break the stalemate in Washington, and this election gives voters the opportunity to replace their current representatives who have been putting politics ahead of country. We deserve much more from our representatives in Congress than what we’ve been getting.

Here are the Republicans:

U.S. Rep. 10th District (Rep)

This district covers Montgomery and Greene counties and part of Fayette County

All candidates were asked to answer these questions:

Question 1: How will you deal with the continuing costs of military actions and the costs of domestic needs?

Question 2: What are the most important issues in this race?

John D. Anderson

Website: www.johnandersonforcongress.com

Bio: Senior Air Force Systems Acquisition Contractor Consultant for Dynamics Research Corporation (DRC). Retired Air Force Civilian Acquisition Manager. Former Air Force B-1B and C-17 Support Equipment Acquisition Division Chief and Depot Material Management policy OPR. 35 years service at WPAFB.

Answer 1: Cap the national debt, cut federal spending, and live within our means. Eliminate unnecessary federal departments; transfer their functions to the states if constitutional. Reform entitlement programs to avoid bankruptcy; transfer Medicare/Medicaid management to the states. Close foreign military bases that have no effect on our national security and bring home our military. Eliminate hundreds of duplicative federal programs designed to perform the same objectives. End corporate welfare and bank bailouts. Terminate funding for no-win wars. Cut off welfare benefits for illegal aliens. End Foreign Aid. Reform the Defense Department Acquisition process by stimulating competition to reduce cost.

Answer 2: The most important issues are job creation, controlling the exploding national debt by cutting federal spending, restoring the Constitution, firing career politicians, ending no-win foreign wars, and reforming the Federal Tax Code. Federal spending is out of control and will bankrupt the nation and destroy the value of our dollar if serious budget cuts are not passed immediately. Restoring Constitutional limits on the federal government will bring deficit spending to an end. This will not occur unless Americans vote the career politicians out of office. Passing the Fair Tax Act is the solution to restore American economic prosperity.

Edward Breen

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Edward-Breen-for-US-Congress/315794945120152

Bio: Earned a BA in History/Political Science from Capital University and Ohio Teaching Certificate from Antioch College. 23 years as Reserve Teacher for Dayton Public Schools. I’m an author, historian, lecturer, precinct captain 8 years. Son of Dayton Mayor/Congressman Eddie Breen.

Answer 1: Strong military presence is necessary to keep our country safe. Keeping abreast of modern technology and having a highly trained special forces is crucial. Educating our children and strengthening the infrastructure as well as maintaining our environment are equally vital to our well-being. Upholding the needs of both our state and our country come at a price. There are many plans in Congress that address these issues such as cutting back on redundancy and wasteful spending, however, both sides are unwilling to find a common ground and get legislation in place so that our nation can continue to move forward.

Answer 2: Creating and maintaining jobs are a priority to Ohioans. Wright Patterson Air Force Base is the foremost aeronautical and aerospace research organization in the Air Force and maintaining its funding is essential. Educating our children so they have the skills to find jobs in an ever-changing global society is critical. Our current representatives complicate the issues by focusing on the needs of their lobbyists and refusing to look outside their partisan agenda. They are mired in gridlock and dysfunction and are unable to work together to pass legislation. What Congress lacks is leadership to come to a common consensus.

Michael R. Turner

Website: www.miketurner.com

Bio: Mike Turner was elected to Congress in 2002 and served two terms as Mayor of Dayton. Rep. Turner is a life-long resident of the Dayton area and lives in Centerville with his wife Lori and two daughters.

Answer 1: Throughout my time in Congress I have advocated for our government to cut spending and cap it at a responsible level so that we may balance our budget. We must remember though that the Constitution empowers Congress to “Provide for the common Defense.” Fulfilling that obligation and meeting our budgetary responsibilities are not mutually exclusive. As a nation, we should be able to provide for our defense and balance our budget. One should not come at the expense of the other.

Answer 2: The most important issues in this race are jobs and growing the economy. As our nation’s economy continues to struggle, I’ve focused on solutions to help spur economic growth and encourage job creation. I’ve consistently supported legislative efforts to reduce the tax burden on families and small businesses, eliminate regulations which stand in the way of our job creators, and help American workers keep a larger share of their hard-earned income. As a senior member of the House Armed Services Committee, I’m focused on growing Wright-Patt and will work hard to protect the jobs and missions at the base.

Note: The Libertarian candidate in this race has no opposition so he doesn’t appear on the primary ballot. David Harlow will appear as a third choice on the November ballot, his website is here:http://www.harlowforcongress.com/index.html still not updated with the correct district.

Also- I’ve not seen Edward Breen at any event- so I have no video of him, but all the other candidates other then Turner, have been video recorded by me and posted on my youtube channel: www.youtube.com/electesrati so you can watch and hear them.

Please share your opinions of all the candidates and their sites and positions here. Thank you. I read all comments and respond to most.

 

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{ 7 comments… read them below or add one }

Diane February 19, 2012 at 1:55 pm

I am a registered Republican, but I have been telling anyone who will listen for the last three years that I am now a one-issue voter. I support the non-partisan FairTax as the single most powerful solution to our country’s screwed up tax collection system. With FairTax, everyone pays and everyone prospers! Fix the income tax mess, and the other problems (job creation, debt reduction, economic growth, etc.) will fall into place. John Anderson has come out publicly as a strong supporter of the FairTax, so he gets my vote.

Brilliant or Bozo? Thumb up 6 Thumb down 3

Dad February 19, 2012 at 8:13 pm

Hidden due to low comment rating. Click here to see.

Poorly-rated. Bozo: Thumb up 2 Thumb down 6

Diane February 20, 2012 at 7:40 am

Dad,

While permitting no exemptions, the FairTax (HR25) provides a monthly, universal prebate to ensure that each family unit can consume tax-free at or beyond the poverty level, with the overall effect of making the FairTax progressive in application. This is not an entitlement, but a rebate (in advance) of taxes paid – thus the term prebate. You can read more about the prebate here: http://www.fairtax.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_basics_main 

There is also a calculator on the FairTax home page by which you can compare the difference between the FairTax and current income tax for you and your family. Most people are pleasantly surprised! The consumption tax would only be on new items, too, so if you buy gently-used things, the tax is zero – YOU are in total control of how much tax you pay.

The more I read and learn about the FairTax, the more amazed I am by its simplicity and fairness to all Americans. Please learn all you can about this non-partisan solution before making up your mind one way or the other.

Brilliant or Bozo? Thumb up 5 Thumb down 2

John Ise February 20, 2012 at 9:13 am

[MARKED AS SPAM BY ANTISPAM BEE | CSS Hack]
From The New Republic on Turner…dolt!.

With Surrogates Like These
Alec MacGillis February 17, 2012 | 5:10 pm

The Republican race briefly jumped ahead from Michigan to Ohio today with the rather overhyped announcement that the state’s attorney general, former U.S. senator Mike DeWine, was switching his support from Mitt Romney to Rick Santorum. DeWine, who was driven from the Senate in the same year as Santorum, 2006, did not mince words in announcing his desertion: “Let’s be honest. In the past months, Mitt Romney and his Super PAC have coupled a remarkable ability to tear down his opponents with an astounding inability to provide voters with a rationale to support him.”

What I found most telling, though, was the attempt by the Romney camp to preempt DeWine with a conference call with Romney supporters in Ohio (and, bizarrely, former New Hampshire governor John Sununu.) Here’s how Ohio Congressman Mike Turner framed his attack on Santorum: “One of the things with Senator Santorum, he’s not even on every ballot. He won’t even be on all the ballots across the country, including Virginia. There tends to be a basic level of the test of competence in running for president, the ability to get on the ballot everywhere to reflect on how you can govern as president. Senator Santorum has looked to his record as a consultant and everyone knows you don’t hire a consultant to run your company. You interview a consultant, you take their advice, throw out half of it and then you turn to managers like Gov. Romney to get the work done and to choose what needs to be done.”

Everyone knows you don’t hire a consultant to run your company. Apparently, Turner was referring to Santorum’s lucrative work since 2006 working as a Washington insider for companies like Consol Energy, work that Santorum has dubiously tried to spin as “consulting” not lobbying, as Newt Gingrich did with his own Beltway dealing. But really, Rep. Turner: did you forget what your candidate did for, oh, eight years before he launched the private equity firm Bain Capital? Yes, he was a consultant. And unlike Santorum, he was a real consultant. He and his colleagues more or less founded the profession of management consulting. The first company he worked at out of Harvard Business School was called Boston Consulting Group, before he left to consult for Bain & Company. There have been whole articles written about Romney’s entire approach to governing being defined by his roots in consulting. So what does Rep. Turner do? He declares—speaking in support of Romney—that “you interview a consultant, you take their advice, throw out half of it.” He declares that “you don’t hire a consultant to run your company”—well, hiring a consultant to run your company was pretty much the whole concept behind Bain Capital, the private equity firm Romney ran for 15 years.

I have to imagine that someone in Chicago happily jotted down Turner’s lines for future use. Then again, maybe Turner was just following Romney’s example. It was Jon Chait, I believe, who noted not long ago Romney’s remarkable habit of accusing others of the traits he himself was most closely identified with—as when he started going after Gingrich for being a flip-flopper on issues like health care and climate change. Maybe, before going on the call, Turner consulted with the former consultant, and this was the line they came up with.

follow me on Twitter @AlecMacGillis

Brilliant or Bozo? Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

Shortwest Rick February 20, 2012 at 11:44 am

Open-Market Sustainability – It’s kind of a tough read at first but well worth the effort.

http://www.thesolutionsjournal.com/node/1039 

 

Brilliant or Bozo? Thumb up 1 Thumb down 0

David Esrati February 20, 2012 at 2:52 pm

Good article Rick- the parts about sustainable ag, taxing waste of resources both are great.

Brilliant or Bozo? Thumb up 0 Thumb down 0

John Ise February 21, 2012 at 1:39 pm

From the New Republic on Mike Turner…what a putz.

With Surrogates Like These

Alec MacGillis
February 17, 2012 | 5:10 pm


The Republican race briefly jumped ahead from Michigan to Ohio today with the rather overhyped announcement that the state’s attorney general, former U.S. senator Mike DeWine, was switching his support from Mitt Romney to Rick Santorum. DeWine, who was driven from the Senate in the same year as Santorum, 2006, did not mince words in announcing his desertion: “Let’s be honest. In the past months, Mitt Romney and his Super PAC have coupled a remarkable ability to tear down his opponents with an astounding inability to provide voters with a rationale to support him.”
What I found most telling, though, was the attempt by the Romney camp to preempt DeWine with a conference call with Romney supporters in Ohio (and, bizarrely, former New Hampshire governor John Sununu.) Here’s how Ohio Congressman Mike Turner framed his attack on Santorum: “One of the things with Senator Santorum, he’s not even on every ballot. He won’t even be on all the ballots across the country, including Virginia. There tends to be a basic level of the test of competence in running for president, the ability to get on the ballot everywhere to reflect on how you can govern as president. Senator Santorum has looked to his record as a consultant and everyone knows you don’t hire a consultant to run your company. You interview a consultant, you take their advice, throw out half of it and then you turn to managers like Gov. Romney to get the work done and to choose what needs to be done.”
Everyone knows you don’t hire a consultant to run your company. Apparently, Turner was referring to Santorum’s lucrative work since 2006 working as a Washington insider for companies like Consol Energy, work that Santorum has dubiously tried to spin as “consulting” not lobbying, as Newt Gingrich did with his own Beltway dealing. But really, Rep. Turner: did you forget what your candidate did for, oh, eight years before he launched the private equity firm Bain Capital? Yes, he was a consultant. And unlike Santorum, he was a real consultant. He and his colleagues more or less founded the profession of management consulting. The first company he worked at out of Harvard Business School was called Boston Consulting Group, before he left to consult for Bain & Company. There have been whole articles written about Romney’s entire approach to governing being defined by his roots in consulting. So what does Rep. Turner do? He declares—speaking in support of Romney—that “you interview a consultant, you take their advice, throw out half of it.” He declares that “you don’t hire a consultant to run your company”—well, hiring a consultant to run your company was pretty much the whole concept behind Bain Capital, the private equity firm Romney ran for 15 years.
I have to imagine that someone in Chicago happily jotted down Turner’s lines for future use. Then again, maybe Turner was just following Romney’s example. It was Jon Chait, I believe, who noted not long ago Romney’s remarkable habit of accusing others of the traits he himself was most closely identified with—as when he started going after Gingrich for being a flip-flopper on issues like health care and climate change. Maybe, before going on the call, Turner consulted with the former consultant, and this was the line they came up with.

Brilliant or Bozo? Thumb up 3 Thumb down 1

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