Front page news that isn’t. DDn racist behavior- those dang black youth criminals

What you put on the front page isn’t always the biggest news- it’s the news you think will sell papers. In the business- the biggest “sellers” go above the fold- so you see it in the paper box window or on the top of the stack.

This article was below the fold- but, it’s there for a reason- to sell papers.

The headline:

One in 3 accused of felonies under 18
West Dayton statistics on arrests show large number of offenses.”

Front page image grab of front page

It’s only news on paper- not online

When you go to the newspaper site online- where there is a “free” teaser area- this article is no where to be found. Had to save the iPad edition to get the link. And let’s be clear, we all know “West Dayton” is a code word for black.

Here is how the article begins:

About one in three people arrested for felony crimes in west Dayton are under the age of 18, police officials said, and juveniles have been linked to a variety of serious offenses in the area, including a string of armed robberies over the summer.

More than 150 juveniles this year have been booked for felony assault, burglary, robbery and theft offenses that took place in west Dayton,

according to data from police reports and records obtained by this newspaper.

Almost 40 percent of suspects arrested for felony theft offenses in west Dayton were minors, compared to 23 percent of theft suspects citywide.

Some West Dayton neighborhoods have a greater share of young residents than the city as a whole, officials said. Education, poverty and socioeconomic factors can play a role in youth crime trends, according to juvenile justice experts.

via One in 3 accused of felonies under 18.

The article continues with more finger pointing statistics:

By comparison, juveniles citywide represented less than 23 percent of felony burglary and theft suspects arrested and less than 27 percent of robbery suspects, according to the police data.

Nationally, less than 22 percent of burglary, robbery and theft suspects arrested are juveniles, according to 2011 data from the U.S. Department of Justice.

We’re in trouble if this is the best quotes we can get from “experts”

Effective intervention programs must target crime-producing needs, such as substance abuse; anti-social attitudes, values and beliefs; anti-social peer associations; and a lack of self-control and problem-solving skills, according to Edward Latessa, a professor and director of the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.

“Montgomery County has a very strong juvenile court and has developed quite a few evidence-based programs to serve youth in the community,” he said.

Dayton police are using analysts to evaluate crime data and police reports each day to determine connections between illegal activities, such as suspects and crime patterns. Officers are then assigned to specific patrols based on the data. Officials said they hope to catch young criminals in the act before their crimes progress in severity.

“The more we can interrupt any kind of patterns, any kind of criminal conduct, the better the neighborhoods will be,” Carper said.

I’ve spent quite a bit of time amongst these “black youth criminals” over the last two summers- hanging green basketball nets on decrepit courts that would get housing violation notices in any other community. Weeds growing through cracks in the pavement that were taller than kids expected to play there (Parkside courts) or rims so rusty you’d have to get a tetanus shot to dunk on safely (Gettysburg park) or backboards so rotted they could barely hold a rim (multiple- but the worst were at Burkham park and Princeton Rec). If you notice something- all these parks are on the West Side. For comparison- go to Jane Reese park in Patterson Park, where there were no weeds, rust, and the backboards and rims were in perfect condition- they even had nets.

I rarely saw adults working with kids on the courts, coaching, mentoring or getting to know their neighborhood kids. One memorable exception was on the old courts from the former Grace A Greene school, off Edison Street, where I ran into a guy with a gaggle of kids- and he was running drills, and teaching them the fundamentals of the game. He was a barber- around 42, and the kids were mostly his own and his deceased sister’s, but this is the kind of intervention we need more of- not police and courts, by the time the cops figure things out and you’re in the court’s eye, it’s already too late.

photo by David Esrati of backboard at Princeton Recreation center in Dayton

Rotting wood, bent rim. This is at one of our few staffed recreation centers

I spent a lot of time at Princeton Rec hanging nets. The courts get a lot of use, and 2 of the rims were the worthless style for chain nets that I had to use zip ties to attach the nets (it took me a year to realize I had to double the zip ties with each attachment point to stop them from becoming a fun game to pop ties by hanging on the nets). I put up three new quality rims at this court because they were missing or so badly broken it had to be done. Note- the Princeton Rec center has full time staff, not many, but some, and I never, ever saw them working with the kids outside. In fact, when I told kids to complain about the backboards and rims to the people inside- the kids told me that the city employees said that it was someone else’s job to take care of the rec equipment at their facility.

I’m not going to go on a diatribe about what needs to be fixed here. My readers are smart enough to know, kids’ youth sports are one of the best and cheapest ways to keep kids out of trouble and interacting with adults in a positive environment. My campaign literature had a picture of my x’s kid, a 10-year-old girl, who was playing football with the Dayton Vikings at the screwed up field on the site of the former Belmont High School. The program had teams at all age levels, equipment for all the kids, and was in a league of about 8 teams based out of Butler County. Figure each team had close to 20 kids, so you had over 100 kids practicing every day of the week in football season.

I ran into Bruce, the “Commissioner” last week at Skyline on Brown. The team shut down last year- apparently the move to Wilbur Wright field didn’t go too well, and the number of kids dropped. All the equipment is in storage. The kids- are on the streets, you know what happens next.

 

 

Dayton Daily news steps to new lows: Candidate faced misdemeanor battery charge

Graphic for Esrati.com

Political Mudslinging reaches epic proportions in Dayton, Ohio.

The free part of this Dayton Daily news “article” reads:

Candidate faced misdemeanor battery charge

The Republican candidate for the Montgomery County commission was arrested in Florida in 1987 after he was accused of shoving his then-wife and breaking a window at their home while carrying a knife, according to a police report obtained by the Dayton Daily News.

Candidate Mike Nolan said the incident was out of character for him and driven by emotion.

This event happened in 1987- and while it’s clearly old news, nothing in the accessible part tells you that “the case was never prosecuted.” which is in the next paragraph.

Nor did they tell you how they “obtained” the police report- probably handed to them by one of the idiots in the Democratic party who thinks they are doing to Nolan what happened to Ed Fitzgerald, just weeks before the election. In case you’ve been living under a rock- it was first revealed Fitzgerald, the Dem candidate for Ohio governor was “caught” in a parking lot at 4:30 am with a “woman who was not his wife” and then it dribbled out that Mr. Former FBI didn’t bother to renew his driver’s license for 10 years- while in political office and driving.

Facebook recently changed its algorithm to stop allowing click baiting links to appear as often in ‘newsfeeds- because the practice was ruining the FB experience- while the Dayton Daily newsless has become less and less of a journalistic endeavor and more of a click mill. The public beatdown of their “blogger” Amelia Robinson just recently for writing about the demolition of the Taco Bell at Wyoming and Brown- even though the building had been gone for a week was  quite entertaining- I’m waiting another week for her to write about the Burger King remodeling on Brown or the demolition of the very expensive pharmacy at the corner of Warren and Oak that was built for the Medicine Shoppe but never opened because MVH had changed its mind at the last minute. But I’m heading on a tangent- back to Mike Nolan.

For the record- I really don’t know Mike Nolan from Adam. I do know the other two candidates in the race- Dan Foley, everyone but mine favorite darling “nice guy” and Gary Leitzell, our former mayor and the only independent in the region to have managed not only to get elected but also to make it onto the ballot every time despite the partisan Board of Elections’ best efforts to keep the two juntas in power.

My first experience with Dan Foley was when he was working for then congressman Tony Hall- when I first got to Dayton and had to ask my congressman for some help in sorting out some military pay issues. Foley was probably 19 and had the cushy paying job in the congressman’s office because his daddy was a judge. He had a roommate at the time who was interested in the girl I was dating- and Dan decided to share some things he shouldn’t have with his roommate so his roommate could get the girl.

When I reminded him about this years later- when I’d asked for his backing in a congressional primary, he threw back how I hadn’t backed Rhine McLin against Leitzell as a reason for not backing me. He claimed to have totally forgotten about his breach of my trust- despite him getting an ass chewing from Bear Monita who was then Tony Hall’s chief of staff. My opinion of “the nice guy” image has always been tainted by that experience, but my main complaint is that Foley is nothing but an empty suit driven to keep his lifetime of sucking at the public teat alive. He’s never had a job in the private sector, nor will he ever have a hard time finding one as one of our anointed leaders of the “Monarchy of Montgomery County.”

Leitzell entered the race over a year ago on rumors that Foley was thinking of not running. The rumor was that he was headed over to the Dayton Development Coalition for a job that paid twice what the commission job pays- but when they couldn’t figure out how to slush fund more tax dollars into the DDC- Foley had to run again, at least as a placeholder. Unlike the Dayton Commission- if a county commissioner resigns or dies midterm- his party gets to replace him with anyone it wants- leaving the question of what happens if an independent like Leitzell were in office and got hit by a bus? Does the “independent party” get to select a replacement? Are you starting to see the picture?

I know Gary Leitzell pretty well. I consider him a friend. Full disclosure,  my firm The Next Wave has helped him with webhosting and printing for his campaigns on a service provider level more than a strategic level. I find Gary’s political naiveté both entertaining and refreshing. I believe his public calls for giving heroin to the worst repeat criminal offenders who are trying to feed their habit the most original thought by a local politico in probably the last 30 years- totally going against what is considered both “safe” and/or “responsible” campaign playbooks would suggest. I believe that he would be the first county commissioner to have an original thought or initiative since I’ve been in Montgomery County (1983).

Back around to the Nolan slander piece in the “Newspaper”- I believe that the public has every right to know what is in the piece- and that it shouldn’t be behind a paywall, weeks before an election. Nolan has not only held public office in this county for years, he has also served as a law enforcement officer for years after this incident. Had it been cause of major concern, he never would have been a sheriff’s deputy. The paper is engaged in a smear campaign- nothing else at this point. For this to be on the front page of the local section is a disgrace to professional journalism- something the Dayton Daily news has less and less claim to everyday.

I am republishing the entire article as a public service. I have only done this in the past when their articles have featured me in them (mostly with a negative slant). I have in the past, been threatened with lawsuits by their digital department for using their “copyrighted content” in my blog, to which I have a counterclaim of questioning the frequent use of my blog to get their stories as long time readers of this site well know- without EVER giving credit.

I believe the Dayton Daily should remove the paywall on this article- and reveal who delivered the lead on the police report. If they aren’t willing to do that, I would challenge them to change the headline to read “27 year old dropped charges surface about candidate” and a sub-head or lead of “Politics has reached a new low in Montgomery County when mudslinging rises to new lows.”

Here you go – sans paywall. Please consider supporting my legal defense fund when the “newsPaper” attacks. Remember, you also heard it here first.

The Republican candidate for the Montgomery County commission was arrested in Florida in 1987 after he was accused of shoving his then-wife and breaking a window at their home while carrying a knife, according to a police report obtained by the Dayton Daily News.

Candidate Mike Nolan said the incident was out of character for him and driven by emotion. After their divorce, the couple worked together to raise their children, he said.

Nolan faced a misdemeanor battery charge, but the case was never prosecuted.

“It is disheartening that with all the problems in Montgomery County — drugs, crime, gangs and the lack of jobs — the Democrats and the Dayton Daily News have focused on an incident the occurred almost 30 years ago,” Nolan wrote in an e-mail. “I resent their questioning my more than 30 years in law enforcement and public service.”

On the night of the incident, Judith DiCosta, Nolan’s wife at the time, told police he first broke a window, then entered through the front door after a man who was inside left the home to find a phone and call police. DiCosta said her own phone wasn’t working.

Nolan had a knife in his possession, DiCosta told police, but he laid it down once he came inside, the report said.

DiCosta said Nolan pushed her around and then picked her up and told their two daughters — ages eight and six — to get in the car because they were leaving. The police report indicates she had a bruise above her left eye.

Reached last week, DiCosta said she considers the incident a private matter. Nolan was a great father and has proved to be a great public servant, she said.

“I am sure he will make a great county commissioner,” DiCosta said.

Nolan’s opponents in the commission race — Democratic incumbent Dan Foley and independent candidate Gary Leitzell — said the campaign is about issues and accomplishments in office.

“Everybody has the right to screw up,” Leitzell said. “That’s so long ago.”

Nolan, 63, began working for the Montgomery County Sheriff’s office in 1988, and his career lasted until 2010, when he retired as chief deputy. Before that, Nolan worked for the Florida State Highway Patrol for more than four years, until the end of 1984.

He was promoted multiple times at the sheriff’s office and earned excellent marks on his work evaluations. Nolan also served as a Miami Twp. trustee for one term beginning in 2010.

Nolan said he has been married to his current wife, Bonnie Nolan, for 26 years. He and DiCosta were married in 1977.

Records show that in January 1987 DiCosta filed for divorce and custody of the two children in Lee County, Fla. In divorce papers seeking a restraining order, DiCosta claimed Nolan had harassed and physically abused her.

At 10:20 p.m. on June 28, 1987, Cape Coral police were dispatched to a disturbance at their home, according to a police report.

Police said as they approached the home, they encountered Nolan, who was exiting the front door while carrying his wife. He was arrested, but records show a misdemeanor battery charge was dropped in the Lee County courts two months later.

Nolan was 36 at the time and working as a driver for a shipping company, according to his resume. He and DiCosta were legally married, but he was not living at the home.

In a transcript of a hearing on the petition for divorce, DiCosta’s divorce attorney said she would make a “a good faith attempt” to have the misdemeanor charge against Nolan dropped as part of the divorce settlement.

Nolan said the experience helped him counsel his employees when they went through emotional times in their lives.

“Never, has this incident affected my ability to perform as chief deputy with the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, Miami Township trustee or county commissioner,” he said in a written statement.

Phil Plummer, chairman of the Montgomery County Republican party, said the incident only involved accusations.

“He was never convicted of a crime. He had a super career as a law enforcement professional. And he would have never been a police officer if he had any conviction,” Plummer said.

Past behavior has been thrust into the forefront in numerous political campaigns this year, including in the governor’s race, where Democrat Ed FitzGerald has struggled to explain why he went 10 years without a valid driver’s license. Other candidates have had to fight off attacks involving late tax payments from years ago.

In his 2012 race for the U.S. Senate, Republican Josh Mandel made a veiled reference to an accusation from a two-decade-old divorce involving Sen. Sherrod Brown to argue that Brown was a “hypocrite” on women’s issues.

The county commission funds a variety of programs and services related to domestic violence, including the Artemis Center, the YWCA emergency shelter and Erma’s House Family Visitation Center.

via Candidate faced misdemeanor battery charge | www.mydaytondailynews.com.

note to faithful readers- my posting frequency has dropped recently due to large amounts of work- and a few instance of life happening. First- the hit and run motorcycle accident, then there I  started South Park Social Soccer Sundays (more on that later) – and then a broken or badly bruised rib or two from a freak pre-season hockey injury which is still hurting and keeping me awake at night. I’ve tried to give you higher quality articles at a lower frequency to keep you happy. My apologies.

Loss of institutional knowledge at Dayton Daily news showing

A good friend thanked me for posting about the passing of two former candidates for the Dayton City Commission. I didn’t write much- but, both times, the following day, the paper had a decent send-off for these past leaders. Granted, both of them died way too young (55, 53) but, by no means should they have received more ink than this man- Tom Wilson. The sum total of the obit that I could find in the DDn is this:

KETTERING —

Former Montgomery County Sheriff Lewis “Tom” Wilson died Friday, a day after his 86th birthday.

Wilson, of Kettering, served as sheriff from 1979 to 1987.

Funeral visitation is from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday, April 4, followed by the funeral services at 2 p.m. at the Kettering Routsong Funeral home, 2100 E. Stroop Road.

via Former sheriff Tom Wilson dies at 86 | www.mydaytondailynews.com. Posted: 6:26 p.m. Sunday, March 30, 2014

No photo, no recollections, no noted accomplishments- just what amounts to the same as a death notice.

From the paid death notice:

WILSON, Lewis Thomas Of Dayton, Ohio, died peacefully in his apartment at One Lincoln Park on March 28, 2014, the day after celebrating his 86th birthday. Tom was the 5th born to Russell and Madeline Wilson of Falmouth Ky. on March 27th, 1928. His family moved to Dayton where he graduated from Wilbur Wright HS in 1946. While there, Tom lettered in football and track, worked as a lifeguard at NCR’s Old River, and met Lois Joan Anderson whom he was married to for 54 yrs. After high cchool, he got a job with NCR as a key bank setter where he saved up enough money to pay for his first year at UD and was awarded a football scholarship. Tom would soon find his calling and spend a total of 37 years in law enforcement. He served 8 years with Oakwood and graduated from the FBI National Academy. Tom then served 19 years as chief deputy sheriff and 10 years as sheriff of Montgomery County from 1978 to 1988. He was past president of the FBI National Academy Association of Ohio, the Buckeye State Sheriffs Association, Law Enforcement Officers Association of Montgomery County, Ohio-Indiana Police Association, S.W. Ohio Police and Sheriffs Association and was awarded the Ohio’s Outstanding Sheriff’s Award in 1981. His involvement and lifelong contributions to the Dayton community are many where he has served as past president of the Dayton Agonis Club and on the boards for AAA, Goodwill Industries, Dayton Boys/Girls Club, Kiwanis Club, Easter Seals, Camp Fire Council, and Old Time Newsies. He was past master of George Marshall Lodge which became Far Hills Lodge #784, a member of the York Rite Bodies, a 33rd degree Scottish Rite Mason, Royal Order of Jesters, and a past potentate of the Antioch Shrine Temple. Most of all, Tom was deeply dedicated to his family and numerous friends and always strived to deliver an unsurpassed level of excellence in all that he did. Tom was predeceased by his wife, Lois in 2003. She was the love of his life. He is survived by his very dear loving companion, June Mathewson of Centerville, OH; son, Joseph C. Wilson of West Carrollton, OH; 2 daughters, Penny Ellis of Boulder Creek, Calif., and Wendy McArdle of Bristol, Vt.; 2 grandsons, Jason Wilson and Alex Ellis; 2 granddaughters, Caroline McArdle, Jenna McArdle; 2 great grandchildren and a host of loving nieces and nephews. A Masonic service will be held at 1:45 p.m., with a memorial service to follow at 2:00 p.m., Friday, April 4, 2014, at Routsong Funeral Home, 2100 E. Stroop Rd. in Kettering. The family will greet friends in the funeral home from 10:00 a.m. to 1: p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Antioch Building Corp., 107 E. First St., Dayton, OH 45402 or The Dayton Masonic Foundation for the Scottish Rite Learning Center, PO Box 932, Dayton, OH 45401. Condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.routsong.com

Published in Dayton Daily News on Apr. 2, 2014
– See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/dayton/obituary.aspx?pid=170459471#sthash.uj8Jvzy1.dpuf

In the past, the DDn has been criticized for not remembering D-Day, Pearl Harbor Day, MLK Day, etc.- so they make sure to give ample coverage- but, that’s not really news in our community, that’s fluff. A man whp served in our community as the highest elected lawman for a decade, deserved more.

The fact is, with all the “retirements” and cutbacks- the Dayton Daily news institutional knowledge base is minimal. They don’t know the history, the connections, the reason 2+2 often only equals 3 in this community.

My father chastised me for writing about the death notices- and calling them failed obits. I’m pretty sure, had I not written about them, the DDn wouldn’t have either. To Tom Wilson, and all his friends- and I’m sure he had way more friends than I’ll ever have, he deserved better. I’m sorry I didn’t catch it. And to TP, thanks for pointing this out.

 

Dayton Daily news slanders VA for fun and profit

The latest “news” from the paper that publishes stories about its own meteorologist rescuing a kitten – is that in 13 years, the VA has paid a pittance in settlements and attempts to suggest that the VA is a horribly run institution where veterans die from delayed care.

Of course, the metric that’s missing- the VA doesn’t spend a ton of money with Cox enterprises for advertising like the local private hospitals. When you draw a comparison between just the local yokel hospitals and the entire VA system- it’s comparing watermelons to a tenth of a grain of rice.

The fact that the idiots in Congress have latched onto this story is just further proof that we need IQ tests for our Congress as qualifications to run. That the NYTimes calls this an uproar- is an embarrassment to journalism as well:

The uproar over medical care for military veterans involves one of the nation’s biggest health care systems, a far-flung operation that treats 6.5 million people a year at 151 hospitals and 820 outpatient clinics, with more than 18,000 doctors and an annual budget of more than $57 billion.

The need for care has increased with a surge in the number of veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, coming on top of a population of aging veterans who were already straining the capacity of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Improvements in battlefield medicine mean that many service members survive with severe injuries that need treatment after they leave the armed forces….

Q: How big is the Department of Veterans Affairs?

A: The clinics and hospitals serve more than 230,000 veterans a day and deliver care in 85 million appointments a year. The 6.5 million patients treated each year include more than 757,000 whose military service began after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

via History and Context of an Embattled Department of Veterans Affairs – NYTimes.com.

The reality is our private hospital system turns away people every single day for lack of insurance. Billions are paid out in malpractice suits in the private sector- and this is ignoring the fact that many veterans have very serious health conditions due to their military service.

While it’s easy to pick on the VA – by those who have never experienced the system, and that there is always room for improvement, this veteran would suggest that this is just smoke and mirrors distracting Americans from the real failures of the “American Health Care System” that fails many more Americans daily than the VA does in a decade.

The fact that General Shinseki runs a system far bigger than all of Premier Health Partners for less than a tenth of what Premier pays its top dogs, totally escapes the public. The fact that Shinseki, is himself a Service Disabled Veteran who has counted on the VA for care gets overlooked.

Considering that we now have the fewest legislators who have served in the military in our nation’s history, most of them need a real lesson in what public service is.

The VA has been on a massive search for veterans to enroll in its programs- with many veterans unaware that they are eligible for care if they served more than 180 days and have a general or honorable discharge. This manufactured hysteria about failed care isn’t helping the mission or improving the system in a meaningful way.

Our veterans deserve better than being used as fodder for selling newspapers. If someone with integrity exists in journalism today- they’d do a true comparison between this government-run health-care system and the joke of our private one. Dollar for dollar, patient for patient, the VA would win hands down.

Dayton media bias called out

Remember when a guru was going to buy the old Society/Key bank building for half-a-million dollars at auction, and the Dayton Daily News crawled up his legal behind with a microscope, questioning everything about him? I do. I wrote about it: “You must be crazy – to invest in Dayton” It turned out they were partially right, the Commander Swami sold off what he could in the building (including a ton of really nice office furniture for pennies on the dollar) and then neglected to heat the building, allowing pipes to freeze, break and flood parts of the building rendering it worth even less.

But as I pointed out in that article, there were plenty of lawsuits against local “developers” that pretty much go unreported.

A few weeks ago, Larry Ealy turned in enough valid signatures to run as a Democratic nominee for Governor. No less than four articles appeared in the Dayton Daily News about “possible voter fraud” in his petitions. Other candidates have turned in all kinds of wonky petitions- and there is never another word said. In fact, a certain Democratic Party Queen was investigated for forging petitions for a gubernatorial candidate when she was in college and it never made the paper. She’s now sitting in office. What was most interesting was how the paper felt the need to recap an entire story of the questionable prosecution of one of the circulators for conviction of voter fraud years ago- yet, there is no law against a convicted felon circulating petitions in Ohio, nor is there one stopping them from voting (a common misconception).

When I ran for Commission last time, the paper had to make sure that readers knew I had tax liabilities, even though they were small and being taken care of. No mention of one of my opponents failed business ventures with lawsuits galore, or his wife’s vehicular homicide charges. In fact the first time he ran for office, they barely figured out that he didn’t actually live in the city when he filed- and he had to get his property annexed into Dayton to run legally.

Then there is the persecution of Raleigh Trammell, the preacher who used to be able to come and yell at the City Commission at will when he was in his prime. Had I ever raised my voice to the commission like that, I’d have been arrested. Despite the fact that Reverend Trammell had been convicted of felony welfare fraud and served time in the late seventies, no one seemed to question how he was given a contract to administer welfare dollars for years without oversight or why no one else was held responsible? Someone kept signing those checks right? I lost some friends in the local business community for posting this question (three times) “who’s the criminal”  Let’s see, the President of the United States makes $400,000 as the most powerful man in the world, and the CEO of CareSource pays herself $3 million a year with tax dollars that are supposed to go to aid the poor? Oh, but that’s right, without these quasi-governmental contract jobs Dayton would be in bankruptcy just like Detroit right now. Something is wrong when companies that only get tax dollars as income, spend it on lavish CEO pay and hire a bevy of lobbyists.

Nah, the media won’t write about that here.

But, wait, just a week ago, the Dayton Daily news did three pieces questioning the Dayton Development Coalition and their questionable right to be secretive with their financials, despite being a quasi-governmental organization. Never mentioned their hiring of Congressman Turner’s former wife on a grossly inflated no-bid contract to come up with a horrible branding campaign. Nope- not a word. You had to read that here on Esrati.com.

Somehow, local developers have managed to tax the little peoples’ income in townships where income taxes aren’t supposed to be levied. That’s right- if you are a white=collar worker, working for a law firm that has a state legislator on staff and a candidate for Lt. Governor- you don’t pay income tax, but if you work for a retailer and are paid close to minimum wage- you pay income tax. Barely a peep in the media- had to read it here: Only the people who don’t pay off politicians pay income taxes at Austin Road

There is a former local restauranteur who made a real mess of her business and is currently serving prison time and facing deportation when she gets out. They’ve had a field day reporting about this stupid case of insurance fraud. Yet, right across the street, there is another restauranteur who has a history that’s even more fascinating that has never hit the local press. Confidential sources inside the Cox Castle confirm that they’ve known about this story- bur didn’t think it was newsworthy. Note, this restauranteur was financially backed by a local kingmaker who likes to think he’s the man behind the curtain and Dayton’s savior.

As they’ve always said- politics makes strange bedfellows.

If you look at the Dayton Daily News over the last year, hardly a week has gone by without some mention of Drones and UAV’s (unmanned aerial vehicle) as our potential economic savior. I’m sorry, but I built model airplanes as a kid and flew them, but that didn’t make me the next big thing since the Wright Brothers. First, we need to get some basic terminology straight- drones and UAV’s aren’t interchangeable terms. A drone is something that isn’t controlled by a pilot. It just goes up and does its thing. UAV’s can be a drone- or they can be remotely piloted. If it’s not bigger than a lawn chair, and it doesn’t fly over 1.000 odd feet- it’s no different than a model airplane (don’t quote me as an FAA source). Really, if this is our future- we’re all in trouble. Even if it’s big- and flies fast and high like a Predator, this isn’t going to solve the world’s problems- not like renewable energy, greener technology, sustainable agriculture. Nope, this is a line of bunk created to keep a small group of fear-o-crats in high priced suits in jobs. The Dayton Development Coalition has gotten a hall pass for years, despite it being an illegal slush fund for tax dollars being funneled to lobbying activities. And yes, loyal readers have read that here too- including the flow chart that showed how it was a big circle jerk of money for what is left of Dayton’s old boy network.

I apologize for not writing the story about a sitting mayor who is also a Realtor, handling the lease for a county agency, or about the lack of accountability for a woman dying by dog bites, or any of the other stories people have asked me to write over the last month or so. I’d love to do it, but, unfortunately, when you write articles like this and expose local media bias, your ability to earn a living from local business is hampered. I’ve been working my rear-end off trying to make a living so that I can afford the time to hang basketball nets again this summer- and to pay all my taxes on time (wouldn’t want the paper to write me up again for it). I’ve also got to paint my house by June 1st, and because I do it right (my last paint job lasted almost 20 years before it started to peel), I need to work extra hard.

Of course, if I step on too many toes, I may end up an unsolved murder, like that of the father of a former Mayor. Word on the street has it that his father was killed because of a flip-flop on a vote on a landfill. I’m still wondering when Sgt. Maj. North Woodall‘s murder will be solved- or that of Dayton Police Officer Kevin Brame.

When I first ran for mayor over 20 years ago, I had my office windows shot out two nights in a row. That was a message not to keep screwing with the system. Lucky for you, I’m better at sending messages than receiving them, so here we are 20 years later- the “ad guy with nothing to say” (what former DDn editorial page writer Martin Gottlieb said about me when I ran the first time) is still telling it like it is.Thank you for reading- and your continued support. Did I miss much?

Dayton Daily news/Cox Ohio does the reorg dance- again

In November, the last of what I call the “typewriter brigade” left the building. The old-timers (not really old enough to remember editing copy with scissors and rubber cement paste pot) were the last bastion of true institutional knowledge in the building, took a buyout and tossed their steno books.

With the exception of Tom Archdeacon and maybe one or two others, the last of the true writers disappeared. And with even fewer people in the “integrated newsroom of the future” it didn’t take long to realize, that there were sometimes only one or two people under a manager. Yes, there were chiefs everywhere and even fewer Indians.

So over the last few days- managers were demoted to reporters, and the shuffle begins again- seeking the ultimate combination of low pay and low expectations to create products that aren’t integrated at all in the newsroom of the future.

Apparently there is still an major issue to be resolved with the differing pay scales between news-paper vs news-tv photographers, with the tv guys unhappy with the higher pay of the paper guys. Not that there are any visuals in the paper anymore- or that the video on TV is much more than car wrecks and crime scenes. Again, in the pursuit of the mighty ad dollar, the idea of hiring and paying people who can tell a story isn’t even on their doppler radar.

As long as they can write 3 stories a week fed to them by the Dayton Development Coalition, and run countless “ScareCenter 7″ stories about the weather and the “polar vortex” they think they are producing product worth not only reading- but paying for.

There are stories all over this city of people doing interesting things. There are smart businessmen creating the future without government handouts, and there are college professors creating new, original research. There is an Air Force Base that runs programs that the military doesn’t want or need- and congressmen who work for those who buy them. Yet none of this is what makes the paper- because it takes work to tell those stories.

In a fitting reminder of what real journalism is about, today, at 6pm, PBS Newshour ran former DDn Photo Editor Larry Price‘s piece about compressor mining in the Philippines. The practice is a deadly game of chance for those who work for hours at a time to dig ore from the bottom of 40-foot, water-filled pits. Many are children- and all are exposed to the poison mercury which is used to separate the gold from the silt.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/multimedia/philippinesmine/8.html

Price, btw, has won the Pulitzer prize twice. Publisher Julia Wallace and Editor Jana Collier wouldn’t know what makes a Pulitzer possible if their lives depended on it.

I still read the DDn everyday. My biggest decision is to read it before or after I read the NY Times. I’ve not figured out which way makes me feel smarter- but then again, these days it doesn’t take long to read the DDn, esp. once I skip all the wire copy, there’s not much left.

A few tips to save your time: If the byline is by DL Stewart, Mary McCarty (correction left with the typewriter brigade) or Amelia Robinson- skip it. If it’s by Lynn Hulsey, prepare to read it twice to try to figure out what she’s trying to say. If it’s by Ron Rollins- expect it mostly to be quotes to softball questions or a lightweight treatment of serious issues. Why it takes more than one “editor” to deal with the 2 pages of “editorial” is beyond me.  If you are reading on the iPad app- be prepared for it to be slow to load, confused as to what date it is, and devoid of useful digital features. And if you see a teaser on Facebook- know that it’s just a ploy to get you to hit the paywall- so don’t. As to commenting on FB about DDn stories- stop yourself- you’re just feeding the trolls. And lastly, know that if they do steal a story from esrati.com, they’ll never give it credit like a professional news organization does. That’s why I don’t feel dirty when I pay the Dayton Business Journal for my subscription.

 

 

Dayton Daily news writer Laura Bischoff – pretends to be a journalist

In today’s Dayton Daily news- “reporter” Laura Bischoff questions State Representative Jim Butler’s official bio:

In his official Ohio House biography, state Rep. Jim Butler, R-Oakwood, tells the public that he “served in the United States Navy as a fighter pilot, flying the F-14 Tomcat. ”Butler trained on the F-14 but received a medical discharge from the Navy before he ever landed one on an aircraft carrier or received an assignment to a fleet. So does that still make him a ‘fighter pilot?’ ”

via Lawmaker’s military claims questioned | www.mydaytondailynews.com.

She goes on to cite a Retired Navy Capt. Jack Kennedy- claiming that Butler is “exaggerating his military experience.”

My question is if Mr. Butler had crashed his F-14, would the story have said he wasn’t a fighter pilot? The difference between being a fighter pilot and not being a fighter pilot- is one of them has actually flown a fighter. There are plenty of Naval Captains that never were Captain of a ship- does that still make them a captain (if you want to go totally stupid Capt. Kennedy). In the military, you are assigned a vocation, MOS, which is what you are trained to do, you are also assigned a unit- which may or may not use your vocation. What unit the military assigns you to has nothing to do with your skill set, or what you put on your résumé.

To be clear, there is no 2-pilot seat version of the F-14. If you’re in it- either you are a pilot- a back seat RIO or a jackass VIP getting a chance to shit yourself. The Navy doesn’t let people sit in the front seat and take their $38 million planes for a joyride for giggles.

Unfortunately- they’ll let any fool sit down in front of a computer at the Dayton Daily news and write crap. No lives are at stake, and if you make a mistake, no one dies and you don’t crash $38 million worth of avionics and propulsion systems.

Jim Butler served his country as a jet jockey after graduating from the Naval Academy. There aren’t that many people that get to do that. He now serves as our elected State Representative. Is Bischoff’s next article going to question if he really is a State Rep. because he didn’t sponsor enough bills?

The only thing that needs questioning is why did she write this bullshit article and why did it appear in the newspaper?
Frankly, if you want to talk about dishonor- questioning this naval officer’s résumé in public, when there is no legitimate basis- is the true dishonor.

The editors of the Dayton Daily News owe Mr. Butler a public apology.

Dayton Daily news still can’t sell papers- layoff time (again)

On the same day the “iTeam” blows a mole hill into a mountain with the $3000 trash pickup, the “market vice president” Julia Wallace sent out the following request for about 22 people over 55 to hang up their careers because Cox can’t figure out how to produce a product worth paying for:

October 10, 2013

Dear Staff:

Today, we are offering select Cox Media Group Ohio employees in newspaper content and newspaper sales a Voluntary Separation Plan (VSP). This is an effort to reduce our newspaper expenses to meet the 2014 budget.

Despite the hard work and dedication of employees throughout the company, the newspaper business continues to undergo significant challenges due to the changing media landscape and our local economic conditions. Our 2013 newspaper revenue is down, and we expect that trend to continue into next year. We must scale our business to better align newspaper revenue and expenses.

Our goal is to achieve staff reductions voluntarily, so we have put together a plan that we believe is very generous and will be very appealing to eligible employees. To be eligible, employees must work full-time in CMGO’s newspaper content and sales departments in salary grades 6 through 10. They cannot have retired from Cox before and must meet the following criteria as of October 31, 2013:

  • Have at least 10 years of pension vesting service under the Cox Enterprise, Inc. pension plan and
  • Be at least 55 years of age

Employees have until Friday, November 22, 2013, to submit their decision. That will also be their last day of work if they accept the offer.

It has been almost five years since we last offered a Voluntary Separation Plan and it is not a decision we make lightly. If we do not reach our reduction goal, we will have involuntary layoffs within all areas of the newspaper, including content and sales.

This is a challenging time for newspapers financially, but it is also an exciting time to be in the media business. Our newspapers are important, relevant and valuable to hundreds of thousands of local residents. Our television and radio stations are No. 1 in the market, and we are expanding our digital businesses. CMG Ohio is the leading media company here, reaching more than 90 percent of the Dayton/Springfield DMA.

We will continue to strive for the highest level of journalism, community service and entertainment; to innovate in the digital space; and to leverage the power of all of our brands to drive audience and revenue.

If you have questions, please contact Toni Mitchell or another member of her Human Resources team.

Regards,

Julia Wallace
Market Vice President

Here are some tips for Ms. Wallace-

  • Your senior people are the ones with the institutional knowledge about this community- you lose many more of them and you won’t have people that can find their way to the dump without a GPS.
  • Producing a website for News Radio, TV and for the paper is 3x the work- to do the same thing. Hint: a screen, is a screen, is a screen- TV, iPad, smart phone- one site is all you need- and to state the obvious- more traffic to one site means more ad revenue.
  • If you don’t know who is reading, watching, commenting, and listening- you aren’t worth a dime to advertisers. Giving people access to content- gives you access to their demographic info- which in turn gives you the chance to target ads precisely- which pays more. Wake up and stop playing tease with your paywall.
  • Besides Archdeacon, you have very few people that can tell a story. Better writers sell more papers. Same goes for photos- but you are very lucky to have a crew of shutterbugs like Jim Witmer who can make anything look good. Try using more photos online, tell the story with words and pictures.
  • And last but not least, printing the dead tree edition is stupid. Buy all your subscribers Kindles and stop wasting money and gas making bird cage liners.

If you want to hire someone who not only knows how to find the stories, and get eyeballs, and understands interface design- you’re reading his post right here. I’d be happy to show you how to keep some people employed by producing something people want to pay for to read/watch/listen to.

Sorry for those left slaving in the Cox slammer- you deserve better leadership. And Julia, resign from the Dayton Development Coalition board- no real publisher would allow themselves to be bought by the lobbyists. Drones won’t save us. Repeat after me, Drones won’t save us. Cheers.

For all its flaws, we still need the Dayton Daily news

This morning on Facebook an acquaintance was railing against the new Dayton Daily news paywall. There was an article she wanted to read (ironically about the shift to temp and part-time workers) but didn’t want to pay for.

This is a person who rallies against minimum wage jobs, Monsanto and the 1%, yet, doesn’t think the journalists at the Dayton Daily news should be paid for their work.

In Cleveland this week, the Cleveland Plain Dealer cut home delivery to three days a week and laid off about a third of its newsroom. That means a third less people digging into government doings to uncover unethical behavior, misguided spending and criminal conduct- by corporations, criminals, politicians, etc.

While advertising used to support journalism, times are changing. As is the way we gather news. For many people, they depend on their Facebook friends to share some of the news. Others, who don’t have Internet access, may have to depend on local TV news (which is news “lite” at best). It’s hard to monetize information- which just wants to be free on the Internet. The government is having a really hard time understanding that you can’t classify things as secret that are readily available online (that’s from a NY Times article today- but I’m not going to link to it, because all you free loaders don’t subscribe and don’t read it daily).

I pay for the NY Times. It’s worth every penny to me. Unfortunately, I also pay almost as much for the Dayton Daily news, which isn’t worth nearly as much, but I still need to read it so I know what’s going on in this community since I can’t dedicate my life to full-time blogging).

Recently, I made a switch to read the NY Times first, and then the DDn. It makes me feel smarter- and I can skip over about half of the global and national news in the DDn which is just dumbed down NYT content. I almost feel guilty with this switch up- but, if I have to skim one because I’m pressed for time- the DDn skims much easier since there is less substance.

I still laugh about the DDn pricing structure- an all digital edition with all access actually costs more than buying just the Thursday and Sunday paper which comes with full digital access. They do this to increase their printed circulation numbers because they still think their ad rates are based on the dead tree numbers. Makes me laugh, except for the pile of unopened papers in my living room. I much prefer reading a paper on the iPad these days, even if it is the horrible Olive Software version of the DDn.

If you think journalism is important- and being well informed is a civic duty as I do, get a subscription so we don’t have to see the kind of cuts in Dayton that just went down in Cleveland. And, people in charge of the DDn- please consider a way that I can skip getting your dead tree edition and still get the reasonable rate, at heart, I’m still a tree hugger.

Quit the DDn, travel the world, make a difference: Larry Price triumphs over mediocrity

When I broke the story that Larry C. Price, the two time Pulitzer Prize winning photojournalist, quit his job as head of photography for the Dayton Daily news, it went global fast.

I’d not met Larry before that. Since then, we’ve become friends. Before Dayton, he’d traveled the world recording images of civil rights abuses, wars, famine and  black cowboys in America. His photographs are poignant, thought provoking and beautiful in that they capture the human condition for eternity.

Lately he’s been traveling to Africa and the Philippines where children are being forced into very dangerous mines. The images will haunt you. Last week, his work was featured on PBS Newshour. Of course, you wouldn’t read about this in the Dayton Daily- so it’s on Esrati.com. I’m sorry I didn’t write this last Thursday when the show was on- but, things were hectic.

Children caked in dust and sweat climb in and out of 150-foot mine shafts with dexterity. Their small bodies operate makeshift grinding machines to extract gold from its ore.

Photographer Larry C. Price traveled to remote mining towns in Burkina Faso, along the Ghana and Ivory Coast borders, to document the use of child labor, which is technically against the law but often overlooked in the West African country that depends on gold exports for revenues.

via In Burkina Faso’s Gold Mines, Children Toil Along With Adults | PBS NewsHour.

Watch Children in Burkina Faso Get Dirty Work of Digging Up Gold on PBS. See more from PBS NewsHour.

 Read the full transcript of the video here: http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/world/july-dec13/burkinafaso_07-10.html

The complete project page, documenting the work for the Pulitzer Center is here: http://pulitzercenter.org/projects/burkina-faso-gold-mines-child-labor-exploitation-poverty-migration-famine

Congratulations to Larry for being one of the amazing Dayton Originals, who are doing things that no one else on the planet is doing.