How to get fast affordable business internet in Dayton

Hint- it’s not from Time Warner, it’s not from AT&T and it’s not Cincinnati Bell (they use AT&T’s pipes).
In Dayton- the city- you can’t and won’t get fiber from any of the standard providers.

T-1’s and fractionals are expensive. DSL is dog slow. And you can’t get real upload speeds from cable.

What’s a small tech firm to do?

Call Norm Wentland at Dayton Digital Development (937) 371-3192- and hope and pray you can get an antenna outside your building that can go line of sight to Downtown. Norm is running a peer to peer network over radio waves- and will give you a fixed IP and at least 8Mbs symmetrically up and down for $100 a month.

I mounted my antenna yesterday on the chimney- hooked it up- and got this from www.speedtest.net

Ping 25, download speed 41.43Mbs and upload of 29.64Mbs

Speedtest screen shot from Dayton Digital Development

Yes- the ping is high – most of the time it’s around 19- but the download is a good 10mbs faster than what Time Warner does on downloads and the upload is 6x faster.

Finally- uploading video to YouTube won’t take an entire weekend.

My client at the Dayton Mall with the 3d scans and prints- is struggling with the DSL that’s available there from AT&T. He needs at least 5MBS up- and they are only able to deliver about half that.

How are we supposed to attract business with our water, when our internet flows like frozen molasses? Why are we building parking garages for real estate developers on Water Street when we should be building internet infrastructure for online businesses everywhere? This is the infrastructure of the future- who will need a parking garage after Google perfects the self driving car?

Watching the people from Miller Pipeline destroy South Park streets to put in new gas lines- I’m wondering why we haven’t demanded that all new utility work includes adding fiber to the home? Why should we have to dig everything up again? Unfortunately our digitally delayed politicians have no clue how important basic internet connectivity is.

I posted this on Facebook this morning and already a friend has called Norm. I’ve known about this technology and Norm for years- I’m not sure why I suffered slow internet for so long.

Say good bye to the telco and cable crooks- and get your business up on the fast track.

Here is the real facts on what you get from Time Warner- warning- not quite safe for work:

 

And as a side note- almost all of TW cable and internet was out most of today in South Park because it was windy. Why do we allow ourselves to live in third world internet land?
When Estonia and Vietnam are almost entirely covered by WiFi- and S. Korea has access speeds 20x faster than us, our leadership should have some explaining to do.

In the meantime- you can call Norm.

The ultimate gift for the holidays – your doppelganger!

There is a reason Esrati.com hasn’t been posting as often over the last month- it’s a new kiosk in the Dayton Mall, and they are my client.

On Oct. 15th, a local entrepreneur contacted my firm, The Next Wave, looking for help to open the first of its kind business in North America. The business makes scale sculptures of you- by taking thousands of photographs of you in a 12-second span. The photos are interpolated to build a 3D model, that can be printed in a 3D printer- and delivered to you in about a week.

Great idea- huge success in an ASADA store in Manchester England (ASADA is the name Walmart uses in the U.K.)- where they did gobs of them in the first month they were open. Only thing was, he was to have the machine delivered and installed on November 1st.

Photo of the booth for Doppelganger Labs

Designed and built in a week by The Next Wave for Doppelganger Labs at the Dayton Mall

Normally- naming, branding and marketing plans take months to prepare- but we worked a crazy number of hours- and “Doppelganger Laboratories” was born. Unfortunately, shipping the scanning booth took a bit longer, and while we had the booth ready to go on the 2nd, the scanner didn’t make it here until the 8th (last Saturday). The assembly took 3 people almost 2 days- and at 9 p.m. last night the first scans were completed.

Here is what a scan of Howard from the Big Bang looks like online in the preview, note, the software prefers Firefox or Chrome for the full webGL experience:


And here is Dayton’s finest miniature painter, in full reenactor garb:

The figurines are pretty cool- even though they are made of a melted plastic powder (laser-sintered polyamide to be exact) – that’s colored to match the scan. It comes out feeling like sandstone, and must be handled much like a porcelain figurine would be. Oddly, the statues aren’t waterproof- if they get wet, the colors may bleed.

The actual sculpting/printing takes around 9 hours and isn’t done locally at this point. Turnaround is about a week.

Photo of a graduate with his doppelganger

Memorialize a special event in your doppelganger

As always, people ask how much they cost, and they start at $149 for a 1:12 scale model going up to $249 for a larger 1:8 scale one. How big they are – depends on how big you are. My old friend, RIP, Dan Obravac who was a bit over 7′ would be 7″ for the “small” 1:12 scale and  10.5: for the large 1:8 scale. Vern Troyer- the original MiniMe – who tops out at 2’8″ would make a real small model of about 2.6 inches for a 1:12 scale. The prices for all the versions are here: DoppelgangerLabs shop

The first 150 people to order a Doppelganger will also get one of our cool shirts- which say “Say hello to my little friend”

What I find most interesting is the what is old is new again. Before photography, people had basically three choices to be “memorialized” for others- a drawing, painting or sculpture of themselves. The little sculptures Doppelganger Labs produces are a return of the sculpture as a way of sharing your likeness.

Some of the coolest things we’ve seen are some of the double scans- there is a large model of a guy with his girl getting a piggy-back ride that’s just awesome. Of course, the pregnant sculpture is a way forever to remember the nine-month miracle of birth and share it later with your progeny. Wedding cake toppers are also popular- although big, poofy gowns with lots of lace and super long trains aren’t the best for scanning.

A few things to avoid when heading to the Dayton Mall to get scanned:

Wear big prints or solids. It doesn’t like shiny shoes, shiny belt buckles or earrings. Glasses are a no-no. Fingers do best when held clenched or touching a flat object like the side of your leg, or crossed arms, especially on the smallest scale builds. And remember, the output is more like an artist’s rendering- not a 3d model avatar to play you in Hollywood. Check out the selection of samples at the booth.

There are photos of people holding their statues on the site- I think the ones where the people are wearing the outfit they were scanned in are the coolest. We’re encouraging people to come back in the clothes they wore to be scanned so we can take a photo with you and your Doppelganger. Happy scanning people!

 

 

Why Historic South Park should be in your future: reasons #2438, 2439

Poster for Historic South Park in Dayton Ohio's Shakespeare production of "The Comedy of Errors"

Historic South Park has it’s own neighborhood theater.

Do your neighbors get together and throw together a play? And not just any play- Shakespeare?

Didn’t think so. Not only that- do they invite the world to see it for FREE?

Yep- you can do that tonight, tomorrow and Sunday nights-

Show: The Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare
Director: Susan Robert
Producers: Galen Wilson, Phyllis Tonne

How To Go:
Dates: Friday-Sunday, September 5, 6, 7, 2014
Time: 8:00 P.M.
Location: South Park Green, 601 Hickory Street, Dayton
Admission: Free (donations gratefully received)
Bring a lawn chair or blanket

via The Comedy of Errors | Shakespeare in South Park | Sixth Season | Sept. 5-7 – Historic South Park.

You can park in Emerson School lot, or Hope Lutheran lot- or on the street.

And if the stodgy speaking of the Bard just ain’t your thing-

Poster for the Food Truck Shindig in Dayton Ohio's fabulous Historic South Park Neighborhood

First the Bard, then the lard- gourmet chefs on the go come to South Park

Yep, we have our own food truck Shindig & Street party on Friday Sept 20th from 4-8pm. The party will be down at Burns and Nathan one block South of Coco’s. We’ll have trucks, tunes, t-shirts and more- and the event is free, even though the food isn’t.

These community initiatives are one of the reasons why South Park’s property taxes go up. Come see what the neighborhood you wished you lived in does to keep things interesting.

Check out www.historicsouthpark.org for info on events, rentals, homes for sale and what makes South Park the best neighborhood in the State of Ohio, and a National Neighborhood of the year winner. The site, btw, is hosted pro-bono by The Next Wave, Dayton’s greatest and finest ad agency, which has its global HQ in South Park.

Note, both these fabulous posters were done by other fabulously talented South Park residents.

Making Dayton look good

Today, the second video went live that was produced by my friends Michael and Sandy Bashaw, along with Andy Snow. They involved a ton of local musicians, dancers, performers and showed Dayton at it’s best. The production values are as awesome as their first video- and the song, “Where the rivers meet” is beautiful.

Take a look on this rainy day:

If you want to see the first video- “Where there is love” I wrote about it here: http://esrati.com/where-there-is-love-dayton-ohio-welcomes-everyone/10070/

I think my favorite part of the new video is seeing my friend Nicky Kay- Nick Kzirnis, wailing on his Rickenbacker in front of the yellow sculpture at the corner of 5th and Patterson. While a lot of people made fun of this sculpture when it came out- it’s becoming one of my favorites- I just wish it was someplace other than a traffic island- where more people would interact with it.

When downtown businesses shoot the city in the foot: Parking wars

You know those parking meters at The Greene? The ones where payment is optional and goes to charity? You know how you don’t have to pay for parking at any business anywhere in the suburbs? That The Greene has not one, not two, but THREE parking garages- and they are all FREE?

And then we have downtown Dayton. No, this isn’t one of those get-rid-of-parking-meter rants by some idiot. Parking meters serve a very important purpose- making sure there are spaces for people who just have to run in and run out. Otherwise, the early bird downtown workers would all fill the on-street parking spaces- and no one would go downtown. At least not in a car.

But, we have meters- and the dreaded parking meter maids. You get a ticket and it’s $5 or $10 and it’s no big deal in the grand scheme of things.

Not so in the Oregon District. While everyone knows not to park in the lot next to the porn shop – which sits empty most of the time (even the people going into the porn shop don’t want to park there for fear of being singled out)- recently two establishments have been having a feud and pissing off patrons galore.

Roost and Lucky’s Tap Room are going at it hot and heavy. Lucky’s is probably pissed about losing the spaces out front for Roost’s valet service- and decided to start towing people who park in their little side lot- adding a $100 towing fee to anyone who doesn’t take heed. Now, granted- it’s a private lot, and there are signs. And, it’s happening often- so the first thing Roost should do is to ask where you parked- and have the valet move the car if it’s in Lucky’s lot.
However, if the Lucky’s owners really want to keep their spots free for their customers, they could make their first move by asking the people at Roost to please stop in after their meal to have a beer or two at Lucky’s – or make a donation to a charity much like they do at The Greene. Instead of calling a tow company- get a boot- but, label it a charity boot.

The real question is why has the city not built a garage behind the EPA building, even with a nominal parking fee of $1-$3 – it could change the district into a really amazing place. All the parking spaces out front- could be used for extended patios- closing off the street to cars entirely would make for an awesome party district (especially since the street isn’t even fit to drive on). The garage could even have mixed uses- with more retail on the first floor- and a rooftop party deck- or housing on top. This is an economic development project worthy of tax dollars and would help many businesses- instead of handouts to single companies who promise the world and deliver squat.

For all the money we’ve poured into the Downtown Dayton Partnership- what the Oregon District is still in need of most is public infrastructure to support the businesses. Towing customers is just sending a message to take your money elsewhere and helps no-one in the long run.

(This post was for S.T., who had her car towed on Friday night.)

Hot ticket tip: Human Race does it again

Confession: I don’t like country music. And, most musicals can take or leave. That said, I’ve never been disappointed at The Loft Theater watching a Human Race Theatre (sic) Company presentation, and last night, I loved the performance of “Play it by heart” a country flavored musical.

Human Race Theatre Shot from Play it By Heart

Pictured (l to r): Sharva Maynard, Trisha Rapier and Kathryn Boswell – See more at: http://humanracetheatre.org/1314/heart/photos.php#photos

From the playbill:

It’s the passing of the torch in a country music dynasty as superstar Jeannine Jasper’s long career draws to a close. The changing world of the music industry is about to thrust her little sister, Jamie Lynn, into the spotlight. When an old flame comes calling, Jeannine envisions a quiet life offstage, but Jamie Lynn’s wild ways may cut short her time on top. Stage mother Naomi tries to keep control of her daughters until a scandalous secret comes to light and threatens to tear them apart. A musical about heartbreak and healing, this regional premiere comes alive with an exciting original score filled with new songs from the Nashville Sound to New Country and a book by Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award® winner Brian Yorkey.

Running time: 2 hours, 35 minutes
via The Human Race Theatre Company : Play It by Heart.

I’m always amazed at what they do with the small thrust stage in the Loft, and again, last night, the scene switches from the tour bus, to the CMA’s to a hospital room, to a bar, to the Blue Eagle Dancehall went seamlessly and smoothly through a story that the little synopsis above doesn’t do justice. And while there is a lot of singing moving the storyline – accompanied by a tight little band sitting high stage left, the story and cast carried the show through plot twists that kept me wondering what was coming next.

And when the show was over- there was no surge of applause for any one actor- only because the entire cast worked so well together and fit their parts so well- a tribute to Kevin Moore who directed and is the soul of the Human Race.

One of the keys to this show is really the audience- and last night, I was sad to see about half the seats unsold. When I hear people say “Dayton sucks” or “there’s nothing to do in Dayton” and I see empty seats at one of our most amazing community treasures- it kills me. Please go- and think of it as attending a concert as much as seeing a play- whoop it up after the “Concert performances” – as if you were in the audience at a show at Gilly’s or Canal Public House (two other Dayton treasures).

I admit, that more than a few times, I choked up, and had to stop from tearing up during the show. But, in the end- the show is really about acceptance and the value of honesty. Things that we could use a lot more of in our community.

This is the last show of the HRTC season- please go, you can thank me later.

The play runs through next week

RIP Michael P. Osgood, candidate, community activist

Obit for Michael P Osgood

a tiny obit- for a community leader

I’ll be the first to admit it- I never got along well with Mike Osgood.

But when the second former candidate for the Dayton City Commission dies within a week, way before their time, without a real mention in the DDn- I figure I owe it to them to share the news of their passing with the community. I’m really reluctant to add an obituary category to this site, but of late, it may seem appropriate.

Michael was a friend and protégé of our former mayor, now Congressman Michael Turner.

He was also very active in the Huffman Historic Area- rehabbing and renting houses. He sat on the board of directors for Wright Patt Credit Union, and served on other non-profits’ boards.

Mike ran for City Commission 3 times- first in the 1996 special election which Abner Orrick won. Osgood came in last of four candidates, even trailing Mark Donelson II, who was married to Sherrie McLin.

In 1997- running for the same seat at the normal election time, he again came in 4th of four, with Mary Wiseman and Lloyd Lewis winning.

In 2001 he tried again- for the same seat, and came in third, this time besting Abner, but losing large to Dick Zimmer and Joey Williams.

The tiny obit in today’s paper:
“OSGOOD, Michael P. Age 54, passed, June 3, 2014. Mass 10:30 a.m., June 9 at Church of the Holy Angels. Westbrock F.H., Dayton”

Hopefully, someone can do a better job of sharing Mike’s impact on our community.

Rest in peace, Mike.

TedX Dayton- bravo!

TED talks started out as an invite-only exclusive party for the Illuminati. Technology, Entertainment, Design. But thanks to the web- everyone can go- forever into eternity. TEDx is allowing other places in on the fun. Think of it as the minor leagues- but, the reality is, everyone has a shot to become the next big viral thing- if you nail your subject.

Despite being a tech conference, I was a little relieved when the orders came to put away the digital devices – no tweeting, posting, etc. It allowed me to concentrate on what was being said- I took notes- the old fashioned way- with a pen and notebook.

So on Friday, Nov. 15, 2013, a little over two dozen people took the stage and threw up their best, from Dayton, Ohio. Overall, everyone in the audience thought that today it was an awesome day to be from Dayton, Ohio- from the music and dance performances that broke up the talks to the neuroscientist trying to stimulate brains with electricity to help people identify the enemy in pictures taken by drones- nobody left thinking they’d not gotten their $50 worth and then some.

I knew or was connected to about a third of the people who took the stage- which is as it should be in a small town. The event ran like clockwork. I saw lots of people I knew in the audience- and quite a few I didn’t. I’m sure people who were there will continue to talk about a lot of what they saw and heard today- for quite a while. The interesting part is, once the videos go up- will any of them go “viral”- which ones will connect with people and become a minor legend? The beauty of TED is that even though it’s highly produced – there is always an element of surprise. To me, that’s the beauty of the day.

South Parker Elizabeth Rasmussen and her sisters in Good English kick off TedX Dayton 2013

South Parker Elizabeth Rasmussen and her sisters in Good English kick off TedX Dayton 2013

The first one was listening to my neighbor and her sisters play a short set to open up the show. Elizabeth Rasmussen and her sisters, Celia and Leslie have a band called “Good English” and while I doubt they’ve played too many gigs at 9 a.m., it was cool to say, hey, that’s my neighbor, as the curtain rose.

I’m not going to run down every speaker- but, as someone who prides himself on trying to make others think, these were the things I really liked. Chris Wire talked about thinking without depending on a smart phone and Google. I’ve always been of the mindset that memorization of facts isn’t always as important as understanding concepts and being able to apply them. I always figured I could look something up- I just never expected it to be as easy as my iPhone plus Google- Chris did an awesome job of encouraging people to search for new answers- to show the value of creativity in answers- even when you have to punt. I thought this was particularly pertinent today- as I had to read in the Dayton Daily news how once again, some “leader” in Dayton is touting us as a distribution/logistics hub. Yawn.

There were some inspirational stories that were built to play on heartstrings- I was born poor, but look at me now, wasn’t worthy of a TED talk, although it was a perfectly nice story. However, there was one thing that I did agree with- “champions work together”- something Dayton needs to learn. We do a great job of finding faults with people in this town- “you’re not black, you’re too smart, you’re Jewish, you’re suburban, you’re urban” some sort of way to divide us- instead of bringing us together. This topic came up more than once. Dayton needs to be able to be proud- and if all the 1,000 or so people there today could take the pride they felt today out into the community- we might have a good start on things.

But, I wanted to stick to surprises- things that made me think. Marta Wojcik from Poland asked  “is a place worthy of being the vessel of your memories”- and was talking about nostalgia for comfortable touch-points to your past. She surprised me by talking about creative place-making- vs. our treating our buildings and heritage as disposable. She celebrated the arts- and artists and designers for the ability to create unique things in our community as compared to our penchant for sprawl. I thought of all the people I met in my last campaign- and the memories they shared with me of growing up at Mallory park pool- or at the Roosevelt center- or before that the school- and to think we’ve undone those vessels for what? Finding out later that she was the director of the Westcott House in Springfield took a bit of the wonderment of her presentation out.

Hearing a guy named Roosevelt (and yes, he’s related to the president by the same name) get up and talk about Abe Lincoln as the answer to our modern dilemmas of the divergence of wealth and poverty and the earth and ecology was a reminder that there have been seemingly daunting challenges in the past- that visionary leadership was able to steer a course to a solution, even if it did entail the deaths of more Americans than in all our other battles put together. Learning from history so we don’t repeat it is always thought provoking.

Instead of hearing the same old STEM nonsense- listening to Dr. Nathan Klingbeil explain that by eliminating conventional math prerequisites to get into engineering they have created more engineers, just by approaching the process with an integrated approach. Calculus is only one part of being an engineer- solving problems creatively is another, and Dr. K demonstrated that by taking a different approach, they could have dramatic changes in graduation rates for engineers at Wright State.

When Judith Ezekiel took the stage, I was totally unprepared for her discussion “Changing race”- talking about cultural racism in a way that forced the audience to self-examine. Jewish, black, rich, poor, educated- all the issues wrapped up into one. If there is one talk I’d want to listen to again, and be able to pause, rewind, replay- it would probably be this one. We have race issues in Dayton and if there were someone who could lead the discussion in a meaningful way- I’d put Judith in charge in a heartbeat.

Another surprise came from Justin Howard, proprietor of the Black Box Improv Theater on E. Third St in the Cannery. Although I despise the idea of TedX being used as a commercial for a business- which several people did, Justin demonstrated his passion for improv by winging the whole thing- including pulling an audience member out (we wondered if she was a ringer) and launching into an improv skit with a word shouted out from the audience (me- with blasphemy). Why Justin is doing his thing in Dayton was because he thinks Dayton is a city that’s “blank and ready to go.” He also cautioned us that “no one in Dayton is important”- which I thought was the perfect thing to be said during this day of celebration of Dayton- that we have to start bonding together and championing our city- together.

When asking my friends about what they liked and didn’t like- Dr. David Shuster came up more than once. He took the stage wearing one blue latex glove- and I kept thinking why the Michael Jackson impersonation. Toward the end of his talk he rolled up his black t-shirt and started sticking himself with the acupuncture type needle as a demonstration to make his point. That apparently grossed them out a bit. Oddly, I ran into him on Saturday at the 2nd St. Market- I was wearing my TedX t-shirt, and he stopped me and asked me what I thought. The needle wasn’t what bothered me, it’s that he started out saying that his field- Electrodiagnostic medicine, wasn’t well respected or liked by some. I told him there was no need to start with a negative (a lesson learned on the campaign trail the hard way) and that he hurt his credibility more than helped it with that lead.

I was totally unprepared for SSGT Deondra Parks who shared her story of sitting in a bookstore when a neo-Nazi came in and started shooting black people before shooting himself as his way of “celebrating Hitler’s birthday.” Her strength projected into the audience, her story of forgiveness and triumph was powerful- yet, for some reason, she didn’t get a standing ovation- while the “white woman who was born poor” did. Odd. This is a woman who could teach us all how to roll with the punches and come up on top.

I enjoyed the talk and piano performance of Steffin Johnson, a Stivers grad and now adjunct piano instructor- but, again, he started with the dismissal of a stereotype- that just because he’s a black piano player people expect him to play Fats Waller or boogie woogie. He asked can you tell a person’s color by listening to the music? I once walked out of a Dayton Daily news editorial board session when I asked them to retract a line in a review of a “G Love and Special Sauce” album that started out with “listening to this album, one could hardly believe that they are white” or some such nonsense. I didn’t want to be “endorsed” by a paper that thought you could tell what color someone was by the kind of music they made- they endorsed Bootsie Neal and Dean Lovelace and dismissed me as a crackpot. So much for taking a stand in Dayton, Ohio. Thank you Steffin for bringing this subject up and for the marvelous performance.

I was mesmerized by my friend David Stoneburner’s son- Dillon “Stoney D” with his dance moves as we returned from the “cookie break.” His performance won’t change my life or make me want to learn how to “Pop and lock”- but, it was amazing to watch.

I understand that everyone has different trigger points- and that some ideas connect better with others and that this is just my opinion- but, the last speaker, London Coe of “Peace on Fifth” was the one who gave me a new way to approach what I’ve been trying to do on this site and in my campaigns for office- she said we need to “Date your City.” Go out and explore the wonderful things, meet the people and share and celebrate the talent that we have here. It was the perfect ending to a day full of inspired presentations from the best that stepped up and it was the rallying cry for a city sadly short of pride. We have a lot to love in Dayton, we just have to stop dwelling on the negatives which are so easy to point out as I watched A.J. Wagner do as he self-destructed his campaign talking about Dayton as a dying city.

Dayton is awesome. And, next year at TedX I hope to be on stage. This was Dayton at its best.

 

South Park open house today

Fifteen years or so ago- I noticed a whole lot of houses in the neighborhood for sale. I organized a neighborhood open house. Each realtor or for sale by owner was invited to join. For the cost of one half of one percent of the homes’ listed price, you would be included on a map of the homes that was to be available on the day of the tour- and we’d support it with ads in the paper, and a radio campaign. We had something like 25 houses on the tour that day- and it was a huge success.

A few realtors thought they should get special treatment since they had more listings and tried to welch. A few people didn’t pay- but had their homes open too- but overall- it worked.

Yesterday, on social media, I found out that ten homes will be open in the ‘hood today- including a few beauties. It was organized organically- and I have nothing to do with it. However- this is what the people of South Park do so well- and it’s why our neighborhood can truly stand by its tagline “where neighbors become friends”

If you are in the market for a new home- come on down.

Sunday, November 3rd from 2 to 4 p.m., ten homes will be open and available to tour. If you are looking for a new place to call home, a fixer upper or just want to see what it would be like to live in a great neighborhood like South Park, be sure to stop on by during our Neighborhood Open House!

Everything starts at Ghostlight Coffee1201 Wayne Ave. There we will have maps of the houses featured during the Open House, neighborhood information, great java. From there you’ll begin your tour of our friendly streets and open homes.

Here’s a list of the houses that will be open.

  • 217 Perrine – Michael Royce – Listing Link
  • 3 Bradford – Kamela & Co – Listing Link
  • 604 Oak – Kamela & Co  – Listing Link
  • 219 Adams – The Home Group – Listing Link
  • 14 Johnson-The Home Group
  • 15 Johnson-Private Seller – ready to rehab? This home could be your blank slate to create the home you’ve always wanted.
  • 28 Bonner-Private Owner – soon to be on the market
  • 208 Bonner-The Home Group – Listing Link
  • 121 James-The Home Group – Listing Link
  • 559 Wyoming-The Home Group – Listing Link

Be sure to stop by Blommel Park while you’re in the neighborhood. From 2 to 4 p.m. our social committee will be grilling up hot dogs and will be available to answer any questions you might have about the neighborhood.

Visit www.historicsouthpark.org/open13 to download a map
My personal favorite is 208 Bonner- this is one house I’d move into tomorrow- the only thing I’d change is the spike on the bottom of the Hamilton Dixon stair rail. It’s way too lethally sharp.
Also- 28 Bonner is interesting. It’s something that never fit in the neighborhood- that was recently purchased and totally retrofitted- showing that historic and non-historic can coexist and not be horribly out of place with a little bit of sensitivity.