Old fashioned entry-level jobs

I was having a discussion today about first jobs, entry-level jobs, and “when I was a youngster” type stories.

Someone mentioned that in Oregon and New Jersey they have people pump gas at gas stations. Why? Back when I was a kid, and gas was well under a buck a gallon, not only would they pump your gas- but they’d check the oil, washer fluid and even your tire pressure. Some of them were high school kids, others- were old guys. Every day in grade school I walked past the Shell station on Lee Rd. four times a day- and I’d wave and say hi to “Smiley”- who had to be a grandpa- and was pumping gas. By the time I was in high school, Smiley was gone- and we were pumping our own gas, albeit without a hold-open lever.

A bunch of brothers named Barrett, used to work at the Sohio station. By the time I came home from the Army, one of them ran it. Besides pumping gas, they worked on cars. Now the corner mechanic is a thing of the past.

A lot of kids got their first jobs as baggers at grocery stores. Sure we still have baggers, but back then, it was different. You might push your own cart out the door- but then you’d leave the cart with your purchases at the corral, and they’d give you a plastic disc with a number on it- that you’d hang on the window- and pull back up- and a youngster would load your bags into your car. Not only did carts never get stolen, they also did bash your car in the lot. And kids had jobs.

We all remember paper routes, well those of us who are pushing the half-century mark. Budding entrepreneurs were given a block or two as their local territory. You’d deliver the papers every day according to different instructions. Some inside the screen door, others in a paper box, some up the stairs- or around back. Once a week you’d go knock on doors and hope to get paid. Checks, cash, and it was almost an honor system since almost all paid the carrier instead of having a subscription. It was a very personal relationship. I’m pretty sure many people “bought” the paper just like many buy Girl Scout cookies- just to keep a kid employed. I had favorites on my route. Some would offer me a cookie almost every time I collected. One old guy was a camera collector- he had hundreds of split 35mm cameras. I’d never heard of or seen one before- and he had them all. It was always fun to have him show me his latest acquisition.

My father always talked about being an usher at a movie theater. He, and his friend Johnny Bowles, used to see all the movies that way. I barely remember that job being around when I was old enough to go to the movies.

Now, kids even have a hard time finding jobs in fast food. There are adults competing for those jobs- even seniors, trying to make it on their meager Social Security checks. I’ve had a bunch of kids come through my office via the Montgomery County YouthWorks program, where our government pays for them to make $8 an hour to job shadow, and intern, despite having limited job skills. Right now I’m graced with two awesome young ladies who are both cheerleaders. Their enthusiasm to learn, to experience, to participate is inspiring. But, the sad thing is we are paying tax dollars to make it possible for them to experience jobs that will require them to go to at least two years of college, which is growing more expensive by the minute.

Not everyone is ready to be a college graduate. Not everyone can afford to be, with the amount of money it now costs to go. It’s time to look for ways to create more entry-level jobs – to stop subsidizing Wall Street and look to invigorate the entry-level job market. How can we reward companies for insourcing and creating entry-level workers?

Maybe it’s time to cut payroll taxes on entry-level workers or offer rebates for job creation, instead of tax breaks for promises of new jobs. We need to make it culturally cool to be the person who hires as many local people as possible, and take the pedestal away from those who outsource, offshore and exploit workers.

It’s time for a new version of old fashioned entry-level jobs. Suggestions?

My relocation incentive package

Dear Economic Development Director, Anytown USA

I’m considering moving, and am interested in seeing what kind of relocation incentive package your community will offer me. I’ve watched municipalities in my current location battle each other for developments and job creation numbers, offering all kinds of corporate welfare to justify their existence. I figure I bring value to whichever community I move to, and would like to see what you can offer.

As a 24 year-old college student, I purchased my first home for $14,500. Before the market crash it was appraised at over $128,000. 23 years, 782% rise. I then went on to purchase and rehab 4 other buildings with similar increases in value. What’s more, I served as neighborhood president, started a neighborhood for-profit development company, and was active in the marketing of the neighborhood- where it is now one of only 3 neighborhoods in the city that actually saw property tax valuations rise during the depression (calling the last economic downturn a recession is flat=out fibbing, it’s one of the reason- you have a job though, so, we’ll keep it between us).

I also started a small business, an ad agency. While my employment numbers over the last 23 years never rose above 7, on average, I employed 3 people. Considering that the SBA figures show the following:

Small businesses make up:

  • 99.7 percent of U.S. employer firms
  • 64 percent of net new private-sector jobs
  • 49.2 percent of private-sector employment
  • 42.9 percent of private-sector payroll
  • 46 percent of private-sector output
  • 43 percent of high-tech employment

You can use my job-creating ability as an indicator of your city’s “small business friendly quotient” which you can then market to other entrepreneurs. While I know you like to hit home runs, singles can win games.

As a community organizer/political activist, I can help advocate for innovative and new-urbanist friendly programs. Do you need an independent gadfly to promote bike share systems, year-round schools, subsidized day-care/pre-K intervention, community recreation programs, veteran owned business initiatives? I’m your guy.

My blog, which I’ve been publishing regularly since 2005 is read by all the people who know people in my city and I’m sure that before long, I’ll have your bosses reading me too. I’ve exposed; pay-to-play politics, congressman’s wives running corporate fronts for donations and doing business with a GSA schedule while her hubby sits on the allocating committee, and broke global news when a 2x Pulitzer winner quit the local paper instead of firing half of his photographers on orders from the editor. Note- I may not treat your deals with kudos, but I’m less likely to bite the hand that feeds me if you offer me a really sweet relo package.

I’m also a perennial candidate. You have nothing to worry about when it comes to me taking office, I never win. People either love me or hate me, and since I refuse to take corporate donations, or sell my soul in exchange for votes, I can help give your local elections some level of legitimacy without actually risking your incumbents’ seats. Instead of plastering the city in lame campaign signs in my last race, I hung 300 basketball nets, 3 new rims and cleared all the courts of weeds, trash, broken glass and debris. Look at my campaigns as future ways to augment your underfunded parks and rec department, while you build spec business parks and “tech incubators” with tax dollars. If you want to talk about the drone industry as the future of your region, count me in, I used to build scale models as a kid, and passed the FAST test in the Army. I’m sure that if you give me enough of an incentive package to relocate to your community- I can get a quad copter and use my SDVOB status (I’m a service disabled veteran- who will own a business in your community) to bid on big government contracts for drone research.

I have no kids, so I’m not worried if you fund your schools adequately, or that they even perform. My city gave General Electric a 30-year hall pass from having to fund our schools, all while GE claims to need highly paid engineers to make up its workforce.

To sum up, I’m looking to locate in a JEDD (Joint Economic Development District) where my blue-collar employees are charged an income tax, but my white-collar employees are not. I’d also like a TIF- Tax Increment Financing, where instead of paying taxes to the municipality, I pay them to myself for “investment.” I’d like a relocation and training incentive, where you pay half the salaries of all my employees for the first 5 years if they previously worked at a higher paying job, but are eligible for “retraining assistance.”  I’d also like it if you paid 100% of any classes my hires take at your very fine taxpayer-subsidized community college, even if it’s funded by taxpayers in an adjoining county.

I’d also like some guaranteed contracts with your local governments, grants from your local taxpayer-funded “venture capital fund” and ED/GE grants for job creation and retention.

I figure with these kinds of “economic development” assistance programs, this community activist can add true value to your community and you can add one more reason to keep you employed in redistributing tax dollars for public service into private pockets.

Bid packages are due the first week in January.

(note, I’m not going anywhere, sorry- I just thought I’d write something humorous for the holidays, sorry all of those that wish I’d go away)

Did something change on the GE deal?

When the school board passed the 30-year tax abatement on the GE Power building under pressure from the “economic development” folks who claimed GE wouldn’t come to Dayton without the tax break, the deal for the building and tax abatement was to an LLC. The tax break was for 30 years- yet, now in today’s paper, the building is owned by UD, and GE only has a 15-year lease.

Employees are moving into the new $51 million GE Aviation electrical power research and design center near the University of Dayton main campus.

The presence of employees in the building at 111 River Park Drive is a milestone in this young joint venture between the company and the university. The intent is to use the building to attract more business to GE Aviation and more students to the university…

Owned by the university, the building — called the Dayton Electric Power Research Lab — “gives us the ability to compete at a higher level in electric power on aviation platforms,” Vic Bonneau, president of GE Electric Power Integrated Systems. said.

GE has a 15-year lease on the building with an option to extend the lease, said Derek Bus-boom, project manager during construction.

via GE moves into $51M aviation research site.

Now it seems that the citizens of Dayton just subsidized a building for a private university, at a huge cost to our schools, which are struggling to pay rising health care costs, rising textbook and technology costs, and serve a student body, most of which can’t afford the luxury of an airplane ticket.

General Electric is still one of the most notorious tax evaders in the United States, and UD doesn’t pay property taxes the same way churches avoid them- 5709.07 Exemption of schools, churches, and colleges.

If the GE lease is only 15 years, shouldn’t the tax abatement only be 15 years and renewable? This is not an educational building anymore than the Dragons’ field is a place that hires Dayton Public School students (one of the promises made in the final deal by then Mayor Richard Clay Dixon, to let the taxpayers pay for a facility owned by the team).

It’s time to re-evaluate what this GE facility should be eligible for in terms of tax breaks, and closely monitor employment and wages paid to see if they match the agreement.

The opportunity costs of subsidizing Midmark’s move

On Wednesday, I went to the city commission meeting to speak against handing over tax dollars to a private corporation. As usual, I was working with somewhat faulty information that I’d received from the “Dayton Daily news” in that the money was being approved by the City Commission, but was actually ED/GE funds which are from the County sales tax collections. Either way, it’s tax dollars collected to provide government services being taken from our pockets and put into the pockets of a private corporation. Here is the basics from the PR run in the DDN:

Midmark Corp. will relocate its corporate headquarters to Dayton by July.

The medical, dental and veterinary health care equipment provider said Thursday it has completed lease negotiations and will move the headquarters, to be renamed Midmark Center, to the 1700 South Patterson Building on the University of Dayton’s River Campus. The building once housed NCR Corp.’s headquarters….

Midmark received $100,000 in economic development funding from the city of Dayton to move the jobs. The estimated payroll of the employees moving to the city is $10.8 million, which will generate about $242,000 a year in taxes for the city, according to the agreement between the city and Midmark.

The new headquarters will take up more than 23,000 square feet on the fourth floor of the 1700 South Patterson Building.

via Midmark base coming to Dayton.

Originally, the city had hoped to put Midmark into one of the empty buildings they built via CityWide Development in “Tech Town”- another squander of tax dollars on subsidies of a few private businesses with money that should have been spent on providing best in class services to all citizens. That deal fell through- but UD stepped up, by offering even cheaper space in the NCR HQ building they got for a song when NCR bailed on Dayton. There are unanswered questions about how much UD pays in property taxes vs what NCR paid in property taxes on this property, but that’s something for a paid reporter to investigate.

There is the interesting sidebar to this story, that Midmark’s CEO & President Anne Eiting Klamar also serves on the UD Board of Trustees, making this yet another sweetheart insiders deal.

But before I share my speech, let’s take economics 101. Opportunity costs are the costs of actions not taken, now, and over time. While the five year payback in “income taxes” received sounds wonderful on the $100,000 “investment”- let’s look at the real costs that have already gone into that process.

We’ve paid a myriad of “economic development” people good money to go out and sell out city primarily by whoring tax incentives and deals, instead of selling on our inherent value that we offer. In turn, the money that we’ve wasted on them, and these deals (most of which had no real penalties or clawback provisions and many went far south of positive for the city) has cut our ability to pay for essential government services- like road paving, leaf collection, safety forces, parks and recreation programs, thus making Dayton a less attractive place to live and less safe of an investment- thereby sending a message that we’re a poverty riddled city, much like the ugly girl offering to pay and let a boy have his way with her so she can go to the prom.

Maybe, if we had invested the hundreds of millions we’ve squandered on these “ED” projects over the last 20 years, which benefited a few, at a cost to the many, NCR wouldn’t have left in the first place?

While Midmark may not have any direct competitors in the region, there is also the undemocratic aspect of giving to one company while not giving to their competition- since there are no open competitions for this money, with a guaranteed equal opportunity for all. Banks can’t lend to homeowners with out following the rules of equal opportunity, but our government seemingly gets to pick and choose who to favor. This should be illegal. It reeks of payola to friends and family and political donors much more than it creates wealth. We know that it doesn’t work, because we’ve been losing payroll and investment in the city for about the same amount of time as we’ve been practicing this voodoo juju in the name of good government.

Here is what I said. I was rudely interrupted by the Clerk of Commission as I was finishing up, because the City Commission isn’t really there to hear or respond to citizens at their “public meeting”- they are there to have the shortest possible meeting, so Nan Whaley can get back to her fund raising. For the record, Joey Williams and Dean Lovelace were not in attendance at the March  20, 2013 meeting where this was given:

People often say government would be improved if it was run like a business, but they never take the time to really discuss in depth what business the government should be in.

Apparently, now, the citizens of Dayton are in the medical cabinetry and furniture business- since our tax dollars are about to be invested in Midmark corporation. The payback is supposed to be increased employment and tax revenue for the city- and while that sounds just fine and dandy, it makes me wonder why we chose Midmark- over, well, anyone else?

You see, the tax dollars that are being handed over to Midmark, came out of the pockets of people who are working two jobs just to make their house payments. And their house, well, it’s worth less now because the house a few doors down went into foreclosure and is now occupied by a bunch of dope using thieves, who keep breaking the law and causing the police to visit, oh, 22 times a year on average.

Now those hard working residents, have to buy security cameras, replace the chainsaws that have been stolen out of their garage (twice) and they have to buy new bikes for their kids, a new lawnmower, you get the picture…

Why do hard working Daytonians pay taxes? To hire police officers to stop thieves? To pick up leaves or sweep streets? Apparently not. We pay taxes to invest in Midmark Corporation!

Not only are we spending money on this Midmark giveaway, we pay our hard earned money to hire a staff of “economic development specialists” who seem to believe that they are worth considerably more than a police officer on the street protecting citizens. What if we took those salaries and instead, made sure that Dayton was a safe place to live, where our investments in things like bicycles, lawnmowers, chainsaws were protected?

Maybe it would be easier to live in Dayton and take care of our property, and someone would want to live near us that didn’t engage in crime on a daily basis? Crimes against us.

You see, the criminals stealing my property, aren’t much different than what you are about to do- you are taking my hard earned tax dollar and handing it over to someone else- someone who may even be a business competitor of mine. You are also robbing me of additional police resources- the stuff that I thought my tax dollars were going to be used for.

This isn’t the first time the City has thought they were in a different business than providing services to their residents- I recall a recent initiative to bring a Kroger to the corner of Wayne and Wyoming. Millions of our tax dollars went to acquire options, and property for a grocery store that never came. Just imagine, instead of spending over a million dollars to own an empty lot, you’d spent it on doing the peoples business- police protection, I still might have my bicycle and my chainsaw and my lawnmower- and I wouldn’t be down here wasting my time trying to get the city to stop engaging in “economic development” and try doing the business of the city- which means making our neighborhoods safe and our city an affordable place to do business.

You could probably even cut your income tax rate- if you stopped doing “business” that isn’t any of your business, nor is it mine.

The way you help Midmark is by not getting distracted from what the business of Dayton is.

If you personally want to help Midmark- take your salaries to  the stockmarket and buy stock in Midmark- but that’s the only acceptable thing you should do for Midmark with my tax dollars.

After I sat down, Mayor Leitzell made the lame response, one that reeks of the weakness of vision of our City- “If we didn’t do it, someone else would.” He told me later, everyone on the commission doesn’t like these deals, but fears not doing it. Of course, if everyone else is doing crack, that’s no excuse to do it too, at least, that’s what my momma taught me (well, almost, since crack didn’t exist when my momma was teaching me the difference between right and wrong).

I have an audio recording that’s 7 minutes long, which starts part way into Mr. Down’s explanation that this is County money, and then my talk.

Play

 

What is needed more? An eye in the sky- or an eye on our commission?

The city charter is very specific- the Dayton City Commission is to meet once a week to conduct the cities business. It’s also specific about missing 5 consecutive meetings and it’s time to replace a commissioner- but as we all know, the only thing that’s sacred in the charter is that you need 500 signatures from registered voters to get on the ballot- and, despite graphology not being admissible in the courts- it is often used to disqualify signatures- despite the ridiculous extra required step of notarizing the petitions swearing that John Doe did in fact sign this petition under penalty of law. But- I digress.

It would seem that our City Commission is meeting in private (still) in the guise of “work sessions” (I guess that means they aren’t really working at the commission meeting- or are those just scripted plays for the public- making them “play sessions”). And while I abhor this practice and was arrested while asking how they get away with breaking the law with these meetings, what’s more important is why the Commission is funneling so much money into a local company?

It seems we’re about to spend $120K for an eye in the sky for 120 hours to surveil our city – from a local company that we’re also considering giving a $20K gift to build out their offices in a building we built with tax dollars and are already renting away for pennies on our dollars. From today’s Dayton Daily news (“n” is  intentionally lower case, as much of it is now a direct feed from the Dayton Development Coalition, the Dayton Business Committee and Nan Whaley’s press releases):

Dayton City Commission is considering a request to hire a local company to provide airborne surveillance for police.

The commission originally was scheduled to vote on the contract today. However, city officials said Tuesday afternoon that a vote is being delayed until commissioners can discuss the proposal in a public work session next Wednesday.

According to an agenda the city released Monday, commissioners are considering a $120,000 contract with Persistent Surveillance Systems for wide-area surveillance for the police department. PSS has operations in Beavercreek, Xenia and at Dayton’s Tech Town business park.

Ross McNutt, PSS president, said Tuesday surveillance services would come from a piloted aircraft flying above the city at about 10,000 feet. PSS provides the plane and the pilot, he said.

The plane will be able to monitor an area as large as Dayton’s entire downtown, McNutt said. Only with reports of crimes or instructions from police would the company’s equipment focus closely on specific areas, he said.

PSS camera systems boast a sensitivity 10 times greater than that of IMAX cameras (8.84 million pixels), McNutt, a retired Air Force lieutenant colonel, said last year.

According to the proposed agreement with the city, PSS would provide 120 hours of airborne surveillance. Services will include installation, data capture, analysis and training for up to four police officers. Up to three analyst workstations will also be installed at Tech Town, as well, according to city documents…

Commissioners also are considering a $20,000 development agreement with PSS to build out and lease space on the second floor of a building at Tech Town.

The company’s lease will be nine months, with a four-year renewal option. The company is expected to invest $12,000 to build out the space, according to city documents.

via Dayton ponders airborne cameras.

The first question to be asked is was this contract competitively bid? The second question is why a manned aircraft when this is what drones do much more effectively and efficiently? A local businessman, Mark Herres, is busy selling solar powered drones with high rez cameras to Northrup Grumman (he was the same business man who was ignored on the Emery/UPS hub deal that went no-bid to IRG) that could do the same thing for more hours, for a lot less money.

The city, under police chief James Newby had a fancy for an eye in the sky around 20 years ago. We bought a hobbyists helicopter and trained at least four officers to fly it. After several years it was grounded, then sold off. Apparently, despite our fantasies of matching Columbus for air power in the fight against crime, putting the helicopter up fast enough to actually be useful during a crime wasn’t happening and the program was shot down. How does 120 hours a year really help? And, with the added need to have trained officers monitoring the video feed- maybe the real answer is to think about increasing the size of the police force instead? That’s what Mike Bloomberg did in NYC and saw drops in crime and in incarceration.

It is true that we have a large community of highly trained intelligence analysts in our community, who are in high demand to read and analyze satellite and drone imagery for the military, but, even with real time intelligence, the ability to thwart crime really comes at the hands of the cops on the street. No amount of video makes up for the ability to respond to a crime with appropriate resources. These “investments” in PSS look more like political favoritism in action. It’s a shame that there doesn’t exist an easy to search database of campaign donors to City Commission candidates. If I was a paid investigative journalist, I’d be scanning the donations to a certain City Commissioner who wants to be Mayor and see what the intelligence turns up.

A better investment than planes with cameras might be to invest in our fiber network and build in high resolution video cameras to be placed in key areas so that we have 24/7/365 visual assets in place. $140K will buy a decent number of high resolution cameras and DVRs that can be monitored from multiple locations- even crowd sourcing, to help cut down on crime.

A forward thinking commission would be willing to investigate other options- and discuss this in the legal weekly meeting of the commission, inviting local experts to share their knowledge. That’s one of the reasons I’m running for Dayton City Commission. Please consider a donation to my campaign.

It’s time to not play favorites with tax dollars anymore

Our country was founded on the principle that “all men are created equal.” Yet our local elected leaders seem to think it’s good government to redistribute our tax dollars from the poor to the wealthy while rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic.

To summarize, Heidelberg Distributing is moving its HQ and at least 270 good jobs from Dayton to Moraine. The County ED/GE fund is contributing a pittance to this project, $235,000 of your tax dollars to help this happen. That money could have been used to put 3 more police on the street for a year to protect all of us, or as part of turning Dayton (the region) into a gigabit internet community- a project that would make everyone more competitive- not just Heidelberg.

What makes this deal suck even worse is that Heidelberg is already in a business that’s created and protected by  state laws requiring all alcoholic beverages to be sold by middlemen. This isn’t freewheeling capitalism at work, you or I couldn’t become an alcohol distributor if we tried. How would you feel if you were Bonbright distributing company- which is still in Dayton, knowing that part of your taxes are being given away to your arch enemy?

Heidelberg Distributing Co. is breathing new life into the long-shuttered former Cooper Tire & Rubber Co. warehouse at 3601 Dryden Road, investing $21.2 million in renovations and planning to move its north Dayton operations to the mammoth former industrial building in about six months….

Heidelberg officials said the company will borrow a projected $16.8 million, provide $4.2 million in private equity and use a $235,000 ED/GE grant approved by Moraine and Montgomery County officials to pay for the renovations and improvements.

“It is humbling to be working on a $20 million project that will outlive us and which will be here for generations,” said Heidelberg CEO Vail Miller Jr.

via Long-vacant warehouse receives $21M revamp.

I haven’t had the pleasure of knowing Vail Miller Jr., and I appreciate his company’s long commitment to Dayton (the region and the city). The jobs that he provides are crucial to my imbibing friends (I’m a teetotaler). The excuses that were used in luring GE, or for arranging a sweetheart deal to keep NCR here aren’t applicable to retaining Heidelberg here- his is a distribution business, centered in our area to serve our area. There is no way this business could locate in Sidney and still be profitable due to fuel costs alone.

It’s time to stop redistributing tax dollars and only invest our tax dollars in infrastructure and services that are accessible to all and don’t play favorites. It’s time to invest our tax dollars in things that make our area more competitive and attractive to people outside our area, to lure them here, not to pay ransoms to keep them dancing with the ugly girl at the prom.

Dayton (city and region) should have some pride. Mr. Miller should graciously decline the ED/GE money and direct that it be used for something that would help all businesses- like Gigabit Internet which would give the region a competitive advantage, not just save him rounding error on his amazing new facility.

Ohio Minimum Wage Chump Change Raise vs. the Maximum Pay Jackpot

Ohio raised the minimum wage 15¢ an hour to a whopping $7.85 per hour for 2013.

Making minimum wage gives you annual earnings of $16,328 — a $340 increase.

Tipped employees will receive a minimum wage of $3.93 plus tips. Employees younger than 16 must be paid no less than the federal minimum wage, which remains $7.25, unchanged since 2009.

Wow.

A local “business leader” weighs in with his opinion:

“Raising the minimum wage to this high of a level sounds like another good intention, but it can have bad results,” said Greg McAfee, founder and owner of Kettering-based McAfee Heating & Air. “Many companies can’t afford to pay $7.85 to an employee who, because of lack of experience or training, may only be worth $6 per hour.

“I know there are some trying to support families on minimum wages, but I am not for our government mandating what any employer should pay or make, for that matter,” McAfee said.

New workers in the heating, ventilation and air-conditioning industry often see starting wages of $9 to $10 an hour, McAfee added.

Michael Saltsman, a research fellow with the Washington, D.C.-based Employment Policies Institute, warns that minimum wage increases “redistribute” income among low-wage families, with businesses often raising prices, cutting workers’ hours or doing a combination of both.

Low-income families end up worse off, Saltsman said. And businesses making only “a couple of cents on the dollar” profit margin — independent or small grocers, full- or limited-service restaurants and some retailers — will be harmed, he said.

“Essentially, you have some gaining at the expense of others,” he said.

via Minimum wage in Ohio rises to $7.85 an hour.

As a small business owner, I can tell you that the most expensive part of hiring anyone is the first 3-6 months, where you are training and evaluating performance. Getting people up to speed- even if it’s “flipping burgers” ends up costing more like $15 an hour, with the supervisor, the mistakes, and of course the time spent filling out all the government forms and getting them into your payroll. If the government really wanted to help small businesses with hiring low-skill people and getting them up to speed- they would give small businesses a payroll credit for the first three months for anyone who stays longer than 9 months total.

However, in the same day’s paper, there is an article about the skyrocketing costs of medicine being purchased by the Pentagon.

Department of Defense drug spending has ballooned by more than 123 percent since 2002, from $3 billion to $6.8 billion in 2011, according to Tricare officials. That outpaces by nearly double the overall pharmaceutical sales in the United States, which grew about 67 percent over that time, according to annual reports from IMS Health, which tracks sales for drug companies.

via Pentagon drug budget soaring.

Sure, the cost of treating so many more disabled vets due to the never ending wars in Iraq and Afghanistan is part of the reason for the increase in costs- but, if we look at what drug company top management is making, it’s a lot more than minimum wage.

They were led by giant Pfizer, with more than $8 billion in sales from the Department of Defense since 2002.

via Pentagon drug budget soaring.

Pfizer CEO Ian Reed has done OK by jacking up sales to the Pentagon which is protecting his company from harm- he tripled his pay in one year:

Pfizer Inc. nearly tripled CEO Ian Read’s compensation in 2011, his first full year as top executive of the world’s largest drugmaker, which has been cutting costs and making other moves to compensate for generic competition hurting sales of top medicines.

Read, 58, received compensation worth a total of $18.12 million in 2011, up from $6.42 million in 2010, according to an Associated Press analysis of a regulatory filing Thursday by the maker of Viagra and cholesterol fighter Lipitor.

via Ian Read, Pfizer CEO, Sees Pay Nearly Triple In First Year On Job.

Who pays his salary? Why, the taxpayers of course, including those making minimum wage. While it’s almost impossible to live on $16,328 a year- it’s really easy to live on $18.2 million. In fact, I’m pretty sure that poor Ian, would have to hire people just to help him spend his money- if he even could find things to buy (other than investments, stocks, bonds etc). Here’s the math:

A salary of $1.82E7 equates to a monthly pay of $1,516,667, weekly pay of $350,000, and an hourly wage of $8,750.00.

via Convert my salary to an equivalent hourly wage | Calculators by CalcXML.

Just as a note, the first calculator I found wouldn’t even take that many zeros in the annual pay field.

Just suppose, the United States government, the largest purchaser of goods and services, all of a sudden stopped buying products from companies that pay their executives more than, say, 40x their average employees’ salary? Either the minimum wage would go up, the company would go broke without being able to sell to Uncle Sam or, we’d actually start seeing some of the real controls in spending that the Republicans in Congress keep calling for (as long as we don’t cut spending to either their local pork projects or with their campaign donors).

It’s time for a maximum wage policy in the United States so that the people at the bottom aren’t subsidizing those at the top who are raping our country’s coffers to pay for their extravagant salaries.

The mighty vulture capitalists announce a tenant for UPS site

Possibly in response to the article I posted yesterday, IRG makes an announcement of a tenant.

The Emery/UPS facility at Dayton International Airport is over a million square feet. In their first big “success” we have IRG renting 15% of the space to a local firm, not involved in aviation, and getting tax breaks to move:

2 News has learned a metal tool company with a facility already in Miamisburg has plans to expand into the old Emery cargo hub at the Dayton International Airport.

A source within SB Specialty Metals LLC said the company plans to use at least 150,000 square feet of space to take and distribute metal tool steels.

According to its website, SB Specialty Metals LLC already has ten service centers located across North America.

2 News has learned negotiations are underway with Industrial Realty Group on a lease agreement.

via Old Emery site might have first tenant.

Moving a business from Miamisburg or expanding it from Miamisburg, into space that was ALREADY leased (UPS was in a lease until 2019) is not economic development.

In the meantime- the scrap value is being stolen from the taxpayers by the vulture capitalists at IRG.

Your tax dollars at work as venture capital vs. small businesses at work

If you wonder why Dayton doesn’t have as many police officers as it used to, or firefighters, or recreation centers- it’s because we’ve been so busy doing “economic development” and “job creation” to the effect that fewer people want to live in neighborhoods considered unsafe, and plummeting property values as people move to where they feel safe.

Job creation tax credits and grants and tax breaks are nothing other than corporate welfare. The jobs that are being “wooed” like the ones at the GE Episcenter (which got a 15-year tax break from Dayton Public Schools) aren’t the ones that provide work for the under-educated types that used to be able to find good paying jobs at Generous Motors- they are high-skilled, requiring advanced educational achievement. Guess what- those people that GE is going to hire aren’t going to want to live in Dayton (although they’ll pay taxes in Dayton) – they’ll live in Oakwood with their highly trained safety forces, great schools and well paved streets.

In today’s Dayton Daily News we read about millions of our tax dollars being handed off to big corporations who promise jobs in the future:

The Ohio Tax Credit Authority approved Monday a 75 percent, 15-year Job Creation Tax Credit for Abbott worth an estimated more than $8 million, said Stephanie Mennecke, a spokeswoman for Ohio Department of Development. That’s the largest value tax credit approved Monday, she said.

The second largest was for approximately $4.5 million for a Republic Steel and Republic N&T Railroad Inc. expansion in Lorain, she said. The authority approved 11 total incentive packages Monday.

The Ohio Development Financing Advisory Council also approved Monday a $1.5 million, 10-year, 0 percent interest loan for Abbott’s project.

“There were many factors that lead us to the decision to build a new plant in Tipp City including direct access to a major interstate, quality of available work force, and state and local incentives,” said Abbott spokesman Pete Paradossi in an email Monday. “Other locations were being considered. In the end, Tipp City was the best choice for this plant.”…

The Tipp City plant will create about 240 jobs, according to Abbott.

Tipp City Council members will vote April 2 on a local incentive package for the Illinois-based company, said Brad Vath, Tipp City Assistant City Manager. Vath did not say Monday what the city plans to offer. He said the city is optimistic everything will fall in place and the project will move forward “very, very quickly.”

Pilot Chemical Co., which operates a Butler County facility in Middletown, also received a tax incentive Monday. Pilot received a 50 percent, six-year tax credit worth an estimated $182,006, according to Gov. John Kasich’s office. The Sharonville-based company is planning an expansion at its headquarters, as well as a $42 million expansion project at either its Middletown or Houston, Texas, facilities.

Kasich’s office said Pilot’s project would create an estimated 38 full-time jobs.

via Abbott to begin building $270M plant.

On the flip side of these public fundings of private companies, I’m watching a small start-up try to get out of the blocks. A house painting company that specializes in making new paint stick to old houses- by doing maniacal surface preparation and using high quality paint. He could hire an employee tomorrow to start work, but, he has to pay for licenses, bonding, insurance and purchase capital goods like a scaffold, all out of cash.

Also the minute he hires someone, he has to start paying worker’s comp (which is high for a painting company out of the blocks) payroll taxes- all the things we’re willing to subsidize for the going concern.  And, the person he’s likely to hire- is someone who is also under-employed, needing every dollar earned just to survive.

He has no credit, no tax breaks and zero support. I helped by creating his new identity, printing business cards, door hangers and signs. I set him up with a website and suggested marketing strategies, he’s finishing his first project and about to start his second tomorrow. I also hired him to do some interior painting as he was getting started. He’s having to bid low to prove the value of his product, despite having a few “freelance projects” to show from last year.

When we know that the major engine for job creation is small businesses, why are our tax dollars subsidizing large ones?

When we know that the small business can have an immediate impact- why are the deals being done for jobs that are a year away?

Why do we subsidize any business with our tax dollars? With every subsidy we tilt the playing field to give an unfair advantage to one company over another- not the role for government or a fair use of our tax dollars. Plus, if the big business paid the same taxes as our smaller ones- maybe the burden of starting up wouldn’t be so insurmountable?

Would you like to help a small business get started? Hire one. The Brush and Bucket.

You want your tax dollars to help a big company by costing you more for security systems, slower emergency crew response, new school tax levies to make up for the giveaway- continue to sit on your thumbs while politicians sell you the BS that tax supported “job creation” is a good investment of your tax dollars.

Because when our tax dollars are used as venture capital- the only ones who win are the private companies who get the tax breaks.

 

The “free ride” that’s costing taxpayers. Stop shifting the blame.

Most of the taxpayers in Montgomery County couldn’t tell you how many ice rinks there are in the county. But I can.

  • 2 at Harra arena, Winterland and the Arena. Privately owned.
  • 1 at Kettering Recreation Center. Publicly owned.
  • 1 at South Metro. Privately owned.
  • 3/4 of one at Riverscape. Publicly owned
  • 1 in Randy Gunlock’s back yard, complete with Zamboni. Privately owned and not open to the public.

If you owned South Metro, which sites on the end of a small business park cul de sac behind Wright Brothers municipal airport, you’d be a bit worried if the guy with the rink in his back yard was wining and dining the public officials to use tax dollars to subsidize a new rink that will put you out of business.

We now learn that Gunlock flew up a bunch of public employees to Michigan on a private jet. Two of them, Miami Township Trustee Mike Nolan and Township Administrator Greg Hanahan violated Ohio Ethics Law for public officials and now the taxpayers are going to be on the hook for $8000.  Excuse me, but when people break the law, they pay for it, not the public.

I’ll give you an example for comparison. Former Wright State University basketball coach Ralph Underhill (RIP) was caught and prosecuted for shoplifting around $40 of stuff from Meijer- he was prosecuted and fired from his job.

Why are Nolan and Hanahan not being prosecuted and fired. Ignorance of the law is no excuse. However, when it comes to dealing with the 1% in the United States this is becoming the norm- Wall Street Bankers pillage the economy, bankrupt their firms, while stealing millions or billions for themselves in pay, stock, options and benefits and they get bailed out by the taxpayers.

Are you sick of this? The only reason why our public officials don’t prosecute and convict either their own- Hanahan and Nolan, or Gunlock for racketeering, is because their political campaigns depend on the generosity of people like Gunlock who are de facto, responsible for their positions of power. Unfortunately, the campaign finance disclosure laws are hodge podge- we can see the Federal donations, but can’t link to them for Randall Gunlock- where from 1999-to current, he’s “invested” $69,950

Go here: http://www.fec.gov/finance/disclosure/norindsea.shtml type in Randall Gunlock. Then try just Gunlock and you find, Glenn O., Glenn C., Jill and Sandra, all also funneling money. All connected. We don’t have an easy to search database from the Ohio Elections Commission, so it’s impossible to see how much money the Gunlocks “invest” in local candidates. This is why we need to either take the money out of politics or only allow donations to go through a blind.
From the Dayton Daily News:

The developer of the multimillion-dollar Austin Landing project flew two Miami Twp. officials at his expense to Muskegon, Mich., in 2011, to scout out an arena similar to what the developer wants to build in the Dayton area.

The trustees said Thursday they plan to reimburse RG Properties for costs for the trip after a Dayton Daily News investigation informed them the May 10 trip apparently violated the Ohio Ethics Law for public officials.

Trustee Mike Nolan, who rode on the chartered flight with Township Administrator Greg Hanahan, said he will ask the township to pay RG Properties for their travel costs.

Developer Randy Gunlock said he estimated that the flight cost $8,000, though the township’s exact expense has not been finalized. “We’re going to ask Randy Gunlock to send us a bill. We’ll pay the bill,” Nolan said.

Nolan said he and Hanahan flew with Gunlock and two Miami University officials: Rico Blasi, the RedHawks’ hockey coach; and Steve Cady, a former Miami hockey and soccer coach and now a senior associate athletic director and assistant vice president of finance and business services….

Ohio ethics law prohibits public officials from accepting travel or other things of value from companies or individuals involved in business with the local government, said Paul Nick, executive director of the Ohio Ethics Commission.

Nick declined to comment on this case, but added that public officials “shouldn’t be accepting material things of value” from anyone doing business with the township.

Officials thought free flight was OK…

Nolan, a former chief deputy with the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office, said he asked and was told by Hanahan there was no potential conflict of interest by taking the flight. Hanahan, who is also a German Twp. trustee, has not been available for comment.

The trip came as Gunlock said he was hoping to convince the trustees to form a public-partnership to build an arena on 68 acres owned by the township east of the Austin Boulevard interchange and just north of the Dayton Wright Brothers Airport.

Gunlock questioned whether such trips should violate Ohio law. “If the argument goes you’re not supposed to be doing these types of things, we’ll stop,” he said.

Trustee Deborah Preston said she was unaware of the Muskegon flight. “I’m certain our residents would be upset by a trustee and administrator taking a corporate jet plane ride and then voting to give RG Properties $14.5 million. It doesn’t pass the smell test,” Preston said.

Trustee Charlie Lewis said he supported the Michigan trip in the interest of attracting economic development, but added, “We probably won’t do it anymore if that’s what the statute says.”

On Nov. 8, the trustees voted 2-1 — with Preston opposing — to invest $14.5 million in RG Properties’ second phase to develop east of the interchange. This brings the township’s investment for a park, ice rink, roads and other infrastructure to $23.5 million.

RG Properties has committed to spend $55 million on the project’s second phase, running its total investment to $109 million.

Township officials said they expect to retire their debt through tax incremental financing on the improvements.

Public and private money invested at the new interchange is expected to exceed $200 million.

via Developer paid for officials’ flight to scout arena.

For every tax dollar “invested” in “public/private” partnerships in the name of “economic development” there are winners and losers and the playing field tilts. Put yourself in the shoes of the people who own the South Metro ice rink, who pay their employees, pay taxes and have their life savings invested in the business. How would you feel if the government takes your hard-earned tax dollars and shares them with a very wealthy man to build a brand new ice rink less than a mile from yours- which will put you out of business?

Is this how our tax dollars should be spent? Taken from the masses and given to the few who can afford to give our politicians who’ve been corrupted by having to raise money well in excess of their salaries to run for office to watch over our tax dollars? This is called either “corporate welfare” or “crony capitalism” at best, and stealing from the poor to give to the rich if you want to make it very clear.

This is the root of what the Occupy movement was protesting. It’s why I believe we’ll never have an honest America until we publicly fund elections. It happens at all levels of government and it is no different than the “taxation without representation” that jump started the American Revolution and our country.

Meet the new kings of America. They own our politicians. They live in our community. They are costing us a fortune.

Also note, one of my opponents in the primary, Sharen Neuhardt is part of the 1%, and a partner in the law firm Thompson Hine, which recently abandoned offices downtown for space in Mr. Gunlock’s new “public/privately” financed/subsidized office space at Austin Landing.