How to get fast affordable business internet in Dayton

Hint- it’s not from Time Warner, it’s not from AT&T and it’s not Cincinnati Bell (they use AT&T’s pipes).
In Dayton- the city- you can’t and won’t get fiber from any of the standard providers.

T-1’s and fractionals are expensive. DSL is dog slow. And you can’t get real upload speeds from cable.

What’s a small tech firm to do?

Call Norm Wentland at Dayton Digital Development (937) 371-3192- and hope and pray you can get an antenna outside your building that can go line of sight to Downtown. Norm is running a peer to peer network over radio waves- and will give you a fixed IP and at least 8Mbs symmetrically up and down for $100 a month.

I mounted my antenna yesterday on the chimney- hooked it up- and got this from www.speedtest.net

Ping 25, download speed 41.43Mbs and upload of 29.64Mbs

Speedtest screen shot from Dayton Digital Development

Yes- the ping is high – most of the time it’s around 19- but the download is a good 10mbs faster than what Time Warner does on downloads and the upload is 6x faster.

Finally- uploading video to YouTube won’t take an entire weekend.

My client at the Dayton Mall with the 3d scans and prints- is struggling with the DSL that’s available there from AT&T. He needs at least 5MBS up- and they are only able to deliver about half that.

How are we supposed to attract business with our water, when our internet flows like frozen molasses? Why are we building parking garages for real estate developers on Water Street when we should be building internet infrastructure for online businesses everywhere? This is the infrastructure of the future- who will need a parking garage after Google perfects the self driving car?

Watching the people from Miller Pipeline destroy South Park streets to put in new gas lines- I’m wondering why we haven’t demanded that all new utility work includes adding fiber to the home? Why should we have to dig everything up again? Unfortunately our digitally delayed politicians have no clue how important basic internet connectivity is.

I posted this on Facebook this morning and already a friend has called Norm. I’ve known about this technology and Norm for years- I’m not sure why I suffered slow internet for so long.

Say good bye to the telco and cable crooks- and get your business up on the fast track.

Here is the real facts on what you get from Time Warner- warning- not quite safe for work:

 

And as a side note- almost all of TW cable and internet was out most of today in South Park because it was windy. Why do we allow ourselves to live in third world internet land?
When Estonia and Vietnam are almost entirely covered by WiFi- and S. Korea has access speeds 20x faster than us, our leadership should have some explaining to do.

In the meantime- you can call Norm.

Tax dollars chasing tax dollars for no tax dollars

If the headline sounds stupid, think about this:

The Dayton-Montgomery County Port Authority owes $1.1 million in back taxes on the parking garage on Patterson Boulevard next to the CareSource building at 220 E. Monument Ave. The 220 E. Monument Ave. building is current on its taxes, but the garage is behind.

via Delinquent Downtown Properties – Dayton Business Journal.

Your tax dollars built the Relizon/WorkFlow One/CareSource building and now CareSource- totally funded with your tax dollars- isn’t paying taxes on the building their people are undoubtedly parking in.

But, it just gets more entertaining.

Despite, being literally right across the street from the garage that’s technically owned by the taxpayers- the taxpayers are being stuck with the bill for another parking garage:

The city of Dayton is moving forward with the financing to pay for the new downtown garage for Water Street.

Commission approved Wednesday a bond purchase agreement to borrow $6 million from the Ohio State Transportation Infrastructure GRF Bond Fund Program. Of that, $2.5 million comes through state loan proceeds and $3.5 million from state infrastructure bank bond proceeds. The funding will help pay for the acquisition and construction that supports the three-story 429-space garage that will serve the Water Street development.

via Dayton to borrow $6M to pay for Water Street garage – Dayton Business Journal.

The first article pointed out that almost one in four properties downtown aren’t current on their taxes- but, there have been no cuts to the “Downtown Dayton Partnership” which is supposedly funded with property taxes in the “Special Improvement District” or SID. Never mind the fact that buildings are dropping in value like rocks- as businesses move to Austin Landing where your tax dollars built a brand new mega intersection and funded development in an unincorporated township- where mysteriously, only the little people pay income taxes (people working at Kohl’s and Kroger and Five Guys pay taxes- people working at Teradata or Thompson Hine- do not).

One must also wonder if the closing of all the downtown Dayton exits on I-75 just after Austin Road was built wasn’t an attempt to squeeze the last life out of downtown- so it can turn into more wrecking bills for Steve Rauch and company? Because one way to cut vacancy rate is to just tear down buildings.

In the meantime, getting a police officer to solve a crime in Dayton becomes even more of a pipedream, as the force continues to dwindle because of budget cuts, retirements and a lack of money to pay cops – because, well, parking garages are more important.

I’m just wondering when the city is going to start building garages for people who are still stupid enough to buy houses in our city? Oops- they tried doing that in Wright Dunbar and it hasn’t exactly taken off.

At some point voters need to wake up. There is no silver bullet to save downtown or your neighborhood. If we focus on the basics first- like snow removal, police response times, solving petty crime, cleaning streets- and making the city building department business friendly- we’d see a lot more progress than these Hail Mary moves to “create economic development.”

We also need to take a hard look at what has occurred at Austin Landing- and stop this idea that we can have these tax dodge havens. Those were all Dayton jobs- maybe the answer is to expand the south airport and annex the whole area into Dayton and turning it into an “enterprise zone” (like at the airport- because, well, that’s been so successful).

Heading into the new year end tax time, I’m looking at our whole screwed up multi-jurisdictional taxing mess and thinking of it as a design problem. How would we simplify the collection of taxes in the region and cut the amount of time wasted on fining and forgiving small businesses who can’t keep up with this rats’ nest of jurisdictions?

It’s really pretty simple- one single income tax rate. A single property tax levy. And an absolute limit on numbers of elected officials per people per square mile. And put a complete stop to investing public tax dollars into private developments- that’s not what we pay our taxes for.

But then again- it’s becoming really clear that only little people are expected to pay taxes anymore.

Front page news that isn’t. DDn racist behavior- those dang black youth criminals

What you put on the front page isn’t always the biggest news- it’s the news you think will sell papers. In the business- the biggest “sellers” go above the fold- so you see it in the paper box window or on the top of the stack.

This article was below the fold- but, it’s there for a reason- to sell papers.

The headline:

One in 3 accused of felonies under 18
West Dayton statistics on arrests show large number of offenses.”

Front page image grab of front page

It’s only news on paper- not online

When you go to the newspaper site online- where there is a “free” teaser area- this article is no where to be found. Had to save the iPad edition to get the link. And let’s be clear, we all know “West Dayton” is a code word for black.

Here is how the article begins:

About one in three people arrested for felony crimes in west Dayton are under the age of 18, police officials said, and juveniles have been linked to a variety of serious offenses in the area, including a string of armed robberies over the summer.

More than 150 juveniles this year have been booked for felony assault, burglary, robbery and theft offenses that took place in west Dayton,

according to data from police reports and records obtained by this newspaper.

Almost 40 percent of suspects arrested for felony theft offenses in west Dayton were minors, compared to 23 percent of theft suspects citywide.

Some West Dayton neighborhoods have a greater share of young residents than the city as a whole, officials said. Education, poverty and socioeconomic factors can play a role in youth crime trends, according to juvenile justice experts.

via One in 3 accused of felonies under 18.

The article continues with more finger pointing statistics:

By comparison, juveniles citywide represented less than 23 percent of felony burglary and theft suspects arrested and less than 27 percent of robbery suspects, according to the police data.

Nationally, less than 22 percent of burglary, robbery and theft suspects arrested are juveniles, according to 2011 data from the U.S. Department of Justice.

We’re in trouble if this is the best quotes we can get from “experts”

Effective intervention programs must target crime-producing needs, such as substance abuse; anti-social attitudes, values and beliefs; anti-social peer associations; and a lack of self-control and problem-solving skills, according to Edward Latessa, a professor and director of the School of Criminal Justice at the University of Cincinnati.

“Montgomery County has a very strong juvenile court and has developed quite a few evidence-based programs to serve youth in the community,” he said.

Dayton police are using analysts to evaluate crime data and police reports each day to determine connections between illegal activities, such as suspects and crime patterns. Officers are then assigned to specific patrols based on the data. Officials said they hope to catch young criminals in the act before their crimes progress in severity.

“The more we can interrupt any kind of patterns, any kind of criminal conduct, the better the neighborhoods will be,” Carper said.

I’ve spent quite a bit of time amongst these “black youth criminals” over the last two summers- hanging green basketball nets on decrepit courts that would get housing violation notices in any other community. Weeds growing through cracks in the pavement that were taller than kids expected to play there (Parkside courts) or rims so rusty you’d have to get a tetanus shot to dunk on safely (Gettysburg park) or backboards so rotted they could barely hold a rim (multiple- but the worst were at Burkham park and Princeton Rec). If you notice something- all these parks are on the West Side. For comparison- go to Jane Reese park in Patterson Park, where there were no weeds, rust, and the backboards and rims were in perfect condition- they even had nets.

I rarely saw adults working with kids on the courts, coaching, mentoring or getting to know their neighborhood kids. One memorable exception was on the old courts from the former Grace A Greene school, off Edison Street, where I ran into a guy with a gaggle of kids- and he was running drills, and teaching them the fundamentals of the game. He was a barber- around 42, and the kids were mostly his own and his deceased sister’s, but this is the kind of intervention we need more of- not police and courts, by the time the cops figure things out and you’re in the court’s eye, it’s already too late.

photo by David Esrati of backboard at Princeton Recreation center in Dayton

Rotting wood, bent rim. This is at one of our few staffed recreation centers

I spent a lot of time at Princeton Rec hanging nets. The courts get a lot of use, and 2 of the rims were the worthless style for chain nets that I had to use zip ties to attach the nets (it took me a year to realize I had to double the zip ties with each attachment point to stop them from becoming a fun game to pop ties by hanging on the nets). I put up three new quality rims at this court because they were missing or so badly broken it had to be done. Note- the Princeton Rec center has full time staff, not many, but some, and I never, ever saw them working with the kids outside. In fact, when I told kids to complain about the backboards and rims to the people inside- the kids told me that the city employees said that it was someone else’s job to take care of the rec equipment at their facility.

I’m not going to go on a diatribe about what needs to be fixed here. My readers are smart enough to know, kids’ youth sports are one of the best and cheapest ways to keep kids out of trouble and interacting with adults in a positive environment. My campaign literature had a picture of my x’s kid, a 10-year-old girl, who was playing football with the Dayton Vikings at the screwed up field on the site of the former Belmont High School. The program had teams at all age levels, equipment for all the kids, and was in a league of about 8 teams based out of Butler County. Figure each team had close to 20 kids, so you had over 100 kids practicing every day of the week in football season.

I ran into Bruce, the “Commissioner” last week at Skyline on Brown. The team shut down last year- apparently the move to Wilbur Wright field didn’t go too well, and the number of kids dropped. All the equipment is in storage. The kids- are on the streets, you know what happens next.

 

 

When surveillance is useful

When the Dayton City Commission entertained entering into a contract for a $1,000-an-hour eye-in-the-sky surveillance system, the civil libertarians and privacy advocates came out in droves.

Never mind that there are already cameras in almost every business you visit, every ATM you use, and even mounted on many homes. In South Park we bought 2 portable HD surveillance cams to be used by neighbors who’ve had problems, and a big debate was on where they could be mounted and what they could monitor (thanks mostly to two people for whom I have very little respect).

Yet, with the shooting in Ferguson, MO, there has been a renewed call for personal video cameras for police officers, something I was talking about back in April of 2013. In the Walmart shooting, there is an outcry for the release of the store video camera footage before the Grand Jury has met. Attorney General Mike DeWine has said it shouldn’t be released before the Grand Jury meets, and for once, I’m in agreement.

Those people asking for the footage, were probably the same ones who were anti-drone cam just last year.

Last Tuesday night, I was on my motorcycle when an idiot decided to turn left and hit the rear of my bike as I tried to radically maneuver out of the way. After he hit me, as I lay on the street underneath my bike, he took off. Had the city had an eye in the sky camera, they would have been able to follow his vehicle and catch him, but we didn’t adopt that technology.

Because I was wearing proper gear, and take my riding pretty seriously, I’m one of the lucky ones who gets to walk away from a pretty bad crash. Apparently, that makes it less important for the police to solve than an accident where there is a serious injury. I went to several of the businesses nearby to see if they have footage that shows the traffic, or the accident at the corner of Brown and Wyoming- but had limited luck. Then I started checking other places along the path that they traveled to get to the point of impact- and voila- video. The insurance company is very interested in finding the guilty party, and is investigating. Not that my accident was anywhere near the same magnitude of the Boston Marathon Bombing, but, given the resources and some detective work, it’s becoming much easier to piece together enough information to solve crimes like this.

The problem is, we don’t have the police department able to do it. Our staffing is at or near an all-time low. This is one of the reasons that they were looking at an eye in the sky to begin with.

However, there is also the just plain dumb luck option too- on the way home from the hospital, I saw a car that looked a lot like the one that hit me- right around the corner from my house. Parked right in front of a friend’s house that has video cameras. Resolution enhancement like what you see on 24 or CSI isn’t really possible- but, time and place, and actions can lead directly to who did it. We’ll wait and see if the person waits for the detectives to haul them in, or if they voluntarily turn themselves in.

I understand accidents happen. I’ve been in a few others in my life, but the punk move of taking off, while a guy is on the street pinned under a motorcycle- is unforgivable in my book. That’s why I’m not going to settle down until we find out who did it.

Just as the woman who used to live in my neighborhood who was so against security cameras (until her boyfriend’s car got totaled in the middle of the night- and her neighbors’ cameras caught it on tape and solved the crime) came around, I’m starting to be a proponent of full-time surveillance.

I’m still looking for witnesses, video, photos, from the night of Sept. 2 at Wayne and Wyoming. Please contact me, or Detective Seiter at the Dayton Police Department 937-333-1359 if you have more information.

13 months later- City of Dayton Discovers Nextdoor.com

Back in July of 2013 I wrote about the community building site called NextDoor:

Recently, I ran across Nextdoor.com which is a really great intra-net solution for neighborhoods. The reason I say intra-net is it’s really built for knowing your neighbors and only your neighbors. It has real privacy controls and doesn’t require Facebook membership as so many other sites do (but it does work with a Facebook sign-in).

The beauty of NextDoor is that it’s based on real geography, with verification of members by your actual residence. Taking info from several sources, it verifies identity and geo-maps you to your neighborhood- which a group of you can define the boundaries of. It allows for notifications like a listserve, discussions, classified ads, recommendations and makes it easy to connect neighbors without worry of it showing up in search.

via How to organize your neighborhood online: NextDoor.com.

Today I was notified that the City is officially adopting it as a tool to communicate with the neighborhoods:

The City of Dayton joins Nextdoor

We are excited to announce that the City of Dayton will be working with Nextdoor to provide important information to neighborhoods across the city. As part of this effort, you will see periodic updates from various city departments on Nextdoor South Park. The purpose of these updates is to share official alerts, news, and other notifications that are relevant to your neighborhood. It’s important to note that city staff can only see their own posts and replies to these posts. They will NOT be able to access or view any information that you and your neighbors have shared on Nextdoor South Park. Communicating with city staff is entirely voluntary, and you can see more information here. Please visit our Help Center if you have any questions.

Wow, what will they think of next- municipal fiber, Sportsplex, digital devices for all DPS students, tiny houses, co-housing, fixing up basketball courts….

Why infill housing fails in a failing community. The Tiny House option.

Einstein famously said “insanity is doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result.”

When I see Dayton trying to fix the failure of our community to fulfill the basic expectations of what a city should provide, i.e.: good schools, safe neighborhoods, well maintained infrastructure as well as simple things like basketball nets on courts that aren’t doubling as weed gardens- by building new houses where old ones fell- I just do a forehead smack.

If people wanted to live there, they could have had a home for next to nothing- and fixed it up themselves. If they wanted to build a new home- why would they do it in a block where half the houses are already vacant. Vibrant communities attract vibrant growth. It must be why South Park is one of the few places where property taxes rose- from 20% to 50% in the latest valuation.

So, what can we do to be different? To offer something that can’t be found elsewhere? One of the answers is “Tiny Houses”- something that’s currently illegal in Dayton- and most of the country. If you don’t understand why they aren’t legal, what they are, or what the attraction is- watch this 10 minute video from “Reason TV” (thanks to Teri Lussier for the tip)

Do zoning and building codes really protect our property values- or keep us safe? Or are they just another way for government to stick its nose where it doesn’t belong? Is the reason for big houses- because the construction,  home building, banking and insurance industries don’t want you to build your own house for cash?

What happens when people live in $10,000 houses that use so little energy?

Putting people in a tiny house has been proven to be a much better solution to homelessness.

It also frees up huge amounts of disposable income, when housing is no longer 25% of your living expenses- what do you spend your money on? Travel, dining out, entertainment?

Why must the “American dream” be so connected to the idea of McMansions and suburban sprawl?

Maybe what we should do is allow areas where more than 40% of the structures are vacant to become “zoning free” enterprise zones, where building codes are reduced to common sense stuff- and the stupidity goes away (why must a room have a closet to be a bedroom? Or why can’t a bathroom connect to a kitchen?).

Dayton could be a leader in the Tiny House movement. The only question is why not?

We elect stupid people.

In the latest tiff over who can get the most publicity for a non-issue, Montgomery County Sheriff Phil Plummer should win a prize for the stupidest statement by a local politician:

Plummer said he signed the letter out of concern that taxpayer resources are at stake and that some of the children could join gangs here and get involved in the heroin trade.

“Is anyone vetting these kids? Is anybody doing background checks on these kids?” Plummer asked.“We need to take care of our own first. That’s not a selfish point of view. Everybody says the federal government is going to pay for this, but it is still our tax dollars.”

via Immigrant friendly but mired in controversy | www.mydaytondailynews.com.

How exactly do you do a background check on a kid from a dirt poor country?

I do agree we could try to take care of our own first- with one in five kids living in an environment where there are questions about where their next meal is coming from. Where we have an educational system where an 80% graduation rate from high school is considered OK and even those “graduates” aren’t really ready for college.

We have children here living in conditions that we would send money to a third world country to rectify, yet, Mayor Whaley is offering up the Naval Reserve training facility on Gettysburg to kids from Honduras- while I’ve been talking to people about turning it into a charter boarding school- to provide a safe place for kids to live while their parents or guardians are going through tough times. Yes, we could be taking care of our own first- but, that doesn’t make headlines.

Leave it to the two Dayton Mayors with the biggest egos to have a knock-down drag-out in the media over a non-issue and the dumbest of our local pols to join in. The Beavercreek council- yes, those who fought the RTA from bringing “those people” from Dayton to their mecca of retailing stepped up to say no to immigrant children, as did Plummer and State Rep. Mike Henne who joined Turner in a photo session for the paper.

You can expect to see all of them- out working with our own kids, you know, doing things like making sure our basketball courts have rims and nets on them- and no vegetation growing through the cracks in the pavement?

And while Montgomery County’s latest brilliant solution to the scourge of  the “heroin trade” is to put up badly designed billboards that say “heroin kills”- where are the programs for youth recreation?

I drove by the Gateway Sports complex yesterday and Kettering fields by the river- and saw empty baseball diamonds in the middle of summer on a Saturday afternoon. Contrast that with driving by Delco park almost any day, where you see hundreds of kids playing soccer- with adult supervision.

I’m not saying that sports are an answer to keeping kids off drugs- but, it’s a good start. Where are programs like that in Dayton, Mayor Whaley? And, going back a few years- Mayor Turner?

Last week I went by Mary Queen of Peace on Gramont. I stopped and talked to a guy who lives across the street from the playground and asked what happened to the basketball court rims? He told me the church took them down- and locked the gates.

a personal note-

I just stopped into Tuffy Brooks on Friday and saw my friend Jim. He’s ordering my fourth box of 100 nets. This will clean out my net money. I’m out of stickers to put on the poles to give kids my number to call for a net. I’ll be needing more zip ties- and the chain nets I bought- don’t attach to the rusted “chain” rims I run into at places like Gettysburg park- so I need to buy some type of S hook to put these nets up because zip ties aren’t the answer. If you can spare some money to donate to our own kids, it will go a long way toward my efforts to keep our kids on playgrounds instead of into other stuff.

I’m including a few photos:

  • Esrati hangs nets so kids can play
    Kids behind the Dayton Boys Prep academy
  • Rimless backboard in Dayton Ohio
    This backboard has been missing a rim at Virginia McNeal park- right next to UD Arena
  • Photo of nets taken down and replaced by David Esrati
    Nets I’ve taken down- most of them, with green on the bottom (mine)
  • Gettysburg park leaning backboard
    While the leaning tower of Pisa may be an attraction, this backboard at Gettysburg park isn’t.
  • Rusted rims in Dayton built for chains
    This is the type of S hook I need to source to hang chain nets on these rusted rims
  • Crime scene photo in Dayton Daily news with Esrati net and sticker in background
    I would be happier if my nets didn’t appear in the paper as background for a crime scene

I’ve been reporting issues non-stop with our courts with the Dayton Delivers mobile app. The backboard without a rim at Virginia O’Neal Park- or Welcome Park- depending on which sign you read- was reported resolved a few days after I turned it in. I went back to the park- and the rim was still missing – and I reopened the case. If you have a smart phone- download the app- report potholes, unpainted speed bumps, tall grass in parks, street lights out- instead of grandstanding, lets start seeing our commission get a report each week about the number of issues opened- and resolved in Dayton each week- instead of the focus on Guatemalan kids. Our kids deserve better than this.

And as a side note, I sent a proposal to the Dayton Public schools to ask them to pay $5 per net I hang at their schools and was turned down. The only reason I asked, was because I was called into the office and scolded for placing my “Elect Esrati” stickers on school property with the number to call for a net. Considering buying nets onesy twosy is a $5 proposition- and doesn’t include the labor- I figure I average about 20 minutes per net- including driving time, ladder time, etc.- it was a steal of an offer. I was turned down by the Superintendent. I’m still hanging nets on their properties.

Also note- the only guaranteed maintenance to our parks by our Mayor and her minions- every single one of my stickers on a basketball pole has been scraped off. No nets hung by the city.

 

 

Shit that really matters that you wish politicians would care more about

Dayton Daily News cutting about SGM Woodall Murder

Gone, but never forgotten. SGM Woodall, US Army Special Forces

In today’s Dayton Daily news, the war of words continues about Mayor Whaley’s quest for the spotlight and Mike Turner’s subliminal inferiority complex. It’s July 29th and I’m the only one who remembers every year that a real American hero was gunned down in his home, and that the spineless murderers are still running the streets of Dayton- free.

The headline- which peaks out above my monitor “Veteran of 3 wars, 85, dies in home invasion” is still there- reminding me that there has been no justice for Sgt. Major North E. Woohall. Every year I write a post. Every year I hope for justice.

You don’t hear updates on the unsolved murders in this city at every City Commission meeting from our police chief- because that might remind people that while “economic development” takes millions of your tax money and hands it over to developers and large companies, we can’t hire enough detectives to solve this crime. And while every year I write a post, hoping the day comes when I can take that yellowed piece of newsprint off my wall- I could be adding more just like it.

Photo of the tomb stone of Oscar Keithly Beason, murdered in Dayton Ohio

Another unsolved murder of a veteran in Dayton Ohio

My friend Keith Beason, who is one of the partners at Quincy’s Fish on West Third Street- has to go to bed every night, without knowing who killed his father. Oscar Keithly Beason was another veteran of WWII- killed at 95 in Dayton Ohio. Keith posts things like this on his Facebook wall:

If anyone has any information regarding the murder of Oscar Keithey Beason on or around February 16, 2013 please contact Det. Darrell Smith or Det. David House with the Dayton Police Homicide Department at: (937)333-1166 or (937)333-COPS

The senseless deaths of two senior citizens who served our country is more important than the plight of Honduran children to the people of Dayton Ohio. Our senior citizens deserve the right to feel safe in their homes. Our community deserves to be free of fear. For all the horrible things that may happen to those children in Honduras, our first priority is that our own children, even if they are grown adults, shouldn’t have to go to sleep each night, wondering who killed their father, and are their other senior citizen relatives safe in our City.

That’s shit that really matters- Mayor Whaley, Congressman Turner, how about taking care of our people first?

Why property values and tax revenues are dropping: and how to solve it

Just back from a contentious meeting of Historic South Park Inc. For the last year, the County Prosecutor’s office has been sending high-priced lawyers out to our meeting to answer questions. Of course, since we can’t actually get them to file a case directly, this is a ridiculous waste of resources. Tonight, the two county prosecutors were joined by a city prosecutor, who also, won’t file a case unless it’s brought to them by the police, the city law department, or some other department.

The issue was mostly housing code enforcement, at which the laws have been failing for years to make a real change in our community’s net worth. The problem is that they mostly deal with prosecuting physical issues- peeling paint, overgrown yards, dilapidated and abandoned properties. The secret to South Park’s success has been by focusing on social capital- instead of the bricks and mortar. More homeowners create more stable neighborhoods. Local landlords do better than absentee ones. Law abiding citizens create a sense of security that makes investment possible.

So, why are most of our laws focused on the physical capital? My quality of life isn’t damaged by the peeling paint on my neighbor’s carriage house. Sure, the wood can weather- and eventually rot- and decrease the value or increase the costs of repair- but this is a minor problem compared to the following key issues that are killing our neighborhoods: I call them the four pillars of failing cities.

Bad neighbors are bad for investment

Around 2008/9 a foreclosed home was bought by a drug addict with a brood of criminals for family. On average, we’ve had well over 30 police calls per year to the address. Older sons have been in and out of prison, younger ones are a constant issue for children’s services and truancy officers. Windows are broken, bonfires in the backyard are often used to separate metal from plastic for scrap (including a large number of air conditioners) and since they moved in- a string of 17 years without a single break-in, changed to several a year. Well documented on this site.

While the city has no problem charging law-abiding citizens progressively higher fines for false alarm responses by police, no one is fining the bad neighbors for their draining of city resources for their failure to conform to society’s basic rules. Change this- and shut down homes that require inordinate amounts of public dollars- and not only will the city have more resources, but quality of life will improve in the neighborhood- boosting investor confidence.

Bad bankers are bad for investment

A home once appraised for over $150K gets foreclosed on. It had a woman who was divorced from a disgraced public servant living in it. She owed about $70K on the property- and the bank wouldn’t settle for less than the outstanding debt. They used our county prosecutors and sheriff to bounce her out of the home. Once vacant, they failed to properly winterize the home, forcing the bank to invest about $5k to make the home sellable. They then auctioned the home for $45K. Had they accepted a refinancing deal of $40K (what they netted on the deal) they would have kept her in the home- and not used your tax dollars to process the paper to evict- probably costing the taxpayers another $10K.

The solution: If a bank sells a property for less than what its lowest offer was to the homeowner, they are forced to contribute the difference back to a fund to help assist homeowners keep their properties. If a bank has inventory that is currently not being maintained or properly marketed, they aren’t able to proceed with foreclosures. If a bank takes possession of a property in habitable condition- and sells it in less than habitable condition, due to theft, malfeasance, or incompetence, they are forced to pay the purchaser for all repair costs to return those services.

The foreclosure cycle is only contributing to decreasing property values and it’s insanity for taxpayers to continue to support private enterprise with managing their business. As a small business owner, I can barely count on the courts to help me collect on my court-awarded debts.

Bad property owners are bad for investment

We have properties throughout Dayton that are owned by shell corporations, people in other countries, people who can’t be found. While peeling paint is something the city seems to focus on, the most dangerous physical problems are:

  • Leaky roofs
  • Overflowing gutters, which can cause foundation issues and siding and structural rot
  • Stink trees- weeds that grow at a crazy pace and can break foundations in a few years
  • Critters- raccoons, possums, feral cats, etc., can render a home uninhabitable quickly.
  • Dopers
  • Squatters

The problem is, if you can’t find the owner, how do you address these problems? This is where nuisance property laws and eminent domain could be useful, but both seem to be too much work for our elected public officials. We’d rather wait until the property is to the point where it has to be torn down than create intervention strategies that can avert entropy, which is the real enemy. A vacant home isn’t killing the neighborhood values- unless it begins to have the above problems. Work on systems of notification, fines and seizure in order to prevent non-compliant owners from devaluing others’ properties through their apathy.

Impotent police are bad for investment

No, I’m not talking about cops that can’t become parents, I’m talking about police who don’t have the manpower or the support of the community to enforce community standards. Sure, robberies, murders and vandalism suck- but, quality of life, peace and tranquility are where police can best make their presence felt.

You don’t speed through Oakwood for good reason- they enforce speeding laws- without the assistance of stand in cameras. They come when you call about drunk neighbors, loud music or even not putting your trash cans away. Dayton police would scoff at all of those complaints when in fact, those are the root base of community standards of conduct that make the difference in property values. Investment in community safety may trump all “economic development” dollars ever spent in our community- and pay back many times more, than our current reactive solution of tearing down the detritus of our years of failed priorities.

We, the citizens of Dayton, deserve better. If we had leaders who really understood anything other than how to keep their friends and family on the government dime, we might stand a chance of once again becoming the “Cleanest and safest city in America” worthy of investment.

Choose wisely.

Compost or Green energy plants?

A large scale composting facility in CA

Hi, I’d like to start dumping stinky bio-waste next door to you. I’m the guy who mistakenly demolishes landmark buildings on city contracts. I’ve donated lots of money to elect dunderheads to lead your city into the ground- which has been very good for my demolition business. I charge a lot more to tear down buildings because I get the big contracts from the people I donated to. Won’t you welcome my third world solution to bio-waste to your community?

Steve Rauch, who owns the Dayton Farmersville Road property and an excavation and demolition business called SRI Inc., 1550 Soldiers Home-West Carrollton Road, and business partner Dan Wampler of Mason submitted a conditional use request to the Jefferson Township trustees for the composting facility and two greenhouses.

If approved, the proposed business would be called KOTE (Keepers of the Earth) Organic Farms and take in waste, including fruit and vegetable cut-outs and tea leaves from food processing companies, according to Wampler.

The compost created at the proposed facility would be sold.

via Proposed compost facility topic of NAACP meeting | www.mydaytondailynews.com.

A community meeting with the NAACP chapter is scheduled for Monday June 30 at 6 p.m. at Jefferson High School, 2701 S. Union Road to discuss this plan.

photo of Quasar bio digestor facility

Quasar bio digester facility

On the other hand- meet a guy named Mel Kurtz. He’s a visionary from the Cleveland area who has perfected a process to take bio-waste and put it in big sealed vessels and turn it into green bio fuel. My plants don’t stink- and I can create natural gas cheaper than fracking can- without creating toxic waste water, causing earthquakes or having your property downwind of a shit heap of flies and maggots

What is anaerobic digestion? Anaerobic digestion is a process in which microorganisms break down organic material in the absence of oxygen, creating biogas, which can be captured to use for electricity, pipeline quality natural gas, and motor vehicle fuel. Most of the natural gas used to heat and power homes and businesses in the U.S. comes from underground deposits created millions of years ago by the anaerobic digestion of ancient organic materials. Quasar’s anaerobic digestion system generates a renewable form of natural gas in a matter of days by feeding microorganisms organic waste including: crop residuals, manure, food waste, fats, oils and greases, personal care products, biobased lubricants and municipal waste water.

via quasar energy group.

Mel Kurtz is becoming a very wealthy man with his green technology. And while he can build plants from scratch, he’s tried to put his systems into our area- using old fuel farms for failed “economic developments” – by partnering with a local visionary businessman, but, because either he forgot to grease a bunch of political palms- or, well, he forgot to grease a bunch of political palms, his offers of CNG for $2 a gallon for 20 years, and offering to create clean electricity to power major airport infrastructures have been rebuffed or ignored.

The first fools to pass this up were the Dayton City Commission and Dayton City Manager Tim Riordan. The Emery/UPS facility at the Dayton “International” Airport was tied up in a lease with UPS until 2019, guaranteeing the city a few million a year, a facility maintained to FAA standards, and employment of about 50 people to maintain it.

A local visionary took a plan to the former airport director and UPS to put solar arrays on the roof of the facility, turn the fuel farm that was sitting unused into anaerobic biodigesters, and fill the facility with equipment for disaster relief using RFID tagged supplies and UAVs to fly over a relief site- tracking all the supplies. Cutting edge stuff- instead, they let UPS opt out of the lease for net present value of about $7 million- and handed half of it- and the $100 million + facility that your tax dollars helped build and equip, over to the vultures of IRG, who quickly let the facility go to hell, scrapped the fuel farm, the 4 huge emergency power turbine generators, the computerized conveyor systems  and leased a small portion out to some low tech business with 35 jobs.

That local visionary then turned his sights on Wilmington Airpark. Another flop of “economic development” where taxpayers gave millions to Airborne Express to make an air freight hub, only to be acquired by DHL- and then abandoned. There, a similar fuel farm was waiting for biodigestors- but a former Dayton “economic development expert” who failed his way up to the Ohio Department of Development under Governor Strickland- and then found his way to the Port Authority of Wilmington, has sat and collected a $150K a year paycheck to scrap parts of that airpark just to keep the lights on. In an email that was accidentally cc’d he said flat out that there is no way he’d ever do business with that local visionary.

Problem is- Mel Kurtz, who offered to walk in to Wilmington and invest about $30 million asking nothing other than to sell electricity back at about half the going rate from DP&L/AEG, likes that local visionary. Now Mr. Kurtz, though the local visionary, is moving on to try to work with the people at Montgomery County to set up his systems at both the South Transfer Station and the proposed new Montgomery County Fairgrounds in Brookville. County officials are traveling to Columbus to view one of his systems there. Interesting thing- other than a 20-year land lease and a contract to supply energy at a discount for 20 years- Kurtz isn’t asking for any taxpayer handouts.

I’m not going to tell Derrick Foward and the Dayton Unit of the NAACP what to say at the meeting with the shit pile king of Dayton, but, building compost facilities today is akin to trying to sell mercury filings for teeth, cigarettes as a way to help asthma or thinking that “separate but equal” is a valid solution to civil rights.

It’s time for the people of West Dayton to say enough to being used as a dump for other people’s problems. It’s also time that the people wake up and realize that there are some pretty smart people in our community trying to work their magic, except for the fools we’ve elected over and over with the money supplied by those who have their own interests in mind.